live together

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live together

To live in the same house or apartment together. When talking about people in a romantic relationship, it usually implies that they are not married. My brother and I have started living together to save on rent in the city. I just can't understand why you would get married to someone before you've had a chance to live with them for a while.
See also: live, together
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

live together

 
1. [for two people] to dwell in the same place. I live together with my sister in the house my parents left us. Henry and Jill live together in their parents' house.
2. [for two people] to dwell together in a romantic relationship. I heard that Sally and Sam are living together. They are living together and may get married.
See also: live, together
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

live together

Cohabit, especially when not married. For example, "I ... am only concerned that their living together before the marriage took place should be so generally known" (Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, 1813). [c. 1800] Also see live in sin.
See also: live, together
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

live together

v.
1. To dwell in the same house or premises: My children, parents, grandparents, and I all live together in one big house. We live together with my cats and dogs.
2. To cohabit with someone, especially in a sexual relationship when not legally married: We might get married someday, but right now we are living together. I've been living together with my partner for a year.
See also: live, together
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
There were no significant differences in the percentage of men and women who reported having lived together. Similarly, there were no significant differences in the percentage of respondents who identified themselves as white, black, Hispanic, or "other" with regard to current or previous living together experiences.
Students who were 20 and older (juniors and seniors) were significantly (p [is less than] .0000) more likely to have lived together than students who were 18 or 19 (first year students and sophomores).
Hedonism was defined as belief in the sexual value, "If it feels good, do it." Twenty-three percent of the respondents espousing a hedonistic sexual value system reported having lived together. This percentage was in contrast to 16% of students who were relativistic ("rightness or wrongness depends on the situation").
Respondents who reported that they had dated someone of another race or that they would date interracially were significantly (p [is less than] .05) more likely to have lived together. Given that less than five percent of married couples consist of interracial couples (Statistical Abstract of the United States: 1998, Table 67), interracial dating may reflect an individualistic philosophy.
The Bill will give those who have lived together in long-term relationships legal rights similar to those currently enjoyed by heterosexual couples.
The group found that six out of ten couples who lived together wrongly thought they had the same rights as a married couple.
A study of 1,500 US couples found those who lived together before marriage were twice as likely to split as partners who had never shared a home.
Couples who had lived together first also reported more marital conflict.
Sixty one per cent wrongly believe couples who have lived together for a while have the same rights as married couples.
47.9 per cent of respondents wrongly believe if one half of a couple who have lived together for more than five years died without making a will, the surviving partner would automatically inherit what was left.
It doesn't matter whether you've lived together for twenty years or whether you have children, in the eyes of the law you are treated as two separate individuals.
If the house is in joint names then the equity will be split equally, but if for example Simon and Rachel have lived together in Simon's house, then it goes back to Simon on separation, regardless of how long Rachel lived there.
Although three-quarters of the couples who lived together said they planned to get married in the future, figures showed only three out of every five would reach the altar.
More than half of those who lived together said they thought of the arrangement as a trial marriage.
Even if a couple have lived together for several years and have children they are not regarded in law as common law husband and wife.