live in

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live in

1. verb To dwell or reside in something or some place. They've been living in a hotel room ever since the bank repossessed their home. Her sister lives in small apartment attached to the back of their house.
2. verb To dwell or reside at one's place of employment. Hyphenated if used as a modifier before a noun. The staff of the hotel lives in during the busy season.
3. adjective Dwelling or residing at one's place of employment. Usually hyphenated. We hired a live-in nanny to help us during the night time.
See also: live
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

live in (with someone)

[for servants or lovers] to live in a residence that one might be expected only to visit rather than reside in. Their maid lives in with them. She lived in for a few months before they were married.
See also: live

live in something

to dwell within something or some place. They live in the village. She lives in a large house in the country.
See also: live

live in

to live at the residence at which one works. In order to be here early enough to prepare breakfast, the cook has to live in. Mr. Simpson has a valet, but he doesn't live in.
See also: live
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

live in

1. Reside in one's place of employment or schooling, as in They wanted a baby-sitter who could live in, or Joe was planning to live in at the college. This expression is used primarily for domestic servants or students. [Late 1800s] Also see live out.
2. live in something. Continue in existence, memory, or some feeling. This sense appears in such phrases as live in the past, meaning "to concentrate on past memories," or live in hope of, meaning "to continue anticipating that something will happen." For example, Alice lived in the past; she had no interest in current events, or Jim lived in hope of getting a teaching post. Also see live in sin.
See also: live
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

live in

v.
To reside in the place where one is employed: They were wealthy enough to afford household servants who lived in.
See also: live
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
Integrate light timers or smart lights that you can control with your phone to make your home look lived in and deter break-ins.
Another Shahbaz Khan, 35, said he lived in Rawalpindi but worked in Islamabad and had to travel between the twin cities twice a day.
During her marriage to Roy, Johana lived in twenty different homes and taught at nineteen different institutions in the United States.
EUROPE (see also individual countries) If You Lived in the Middle Ages, Mr6-14, T8 Maps of the World, 017&24-16 Should We Go to War?, Ap24-14 World in Focus, 017&24-29 Who's Who/Government Leaders, 017&24-9
citizens and illegal, undocumented immigrants have lived in a kind of awkward partnership for decades.
Ramon Torres had lived in the United States legally for over a decade.
As this magazine reported years ago (see the story "Cozy with the KGB" in our September 29, 1997 issue), Konanykhine and his wife Elena have lived in the United States since 1992.
Ahmed, who has lived in the Pakistani neighborhood near Devon Avenue since his arrival, left his wife and two young children at home that day.
True, he lived in a homeless shelter with his Svengali-like "stepfather," John Allen Muhammad.
Collado, who was born in the Dominican Republic, has lived in the United States for more than twenty-five years.
There was, for instance, Abraham Soto, a Mexican native who has lived in Chicago for three years.
Although he has lived in this country for more than two decades and speaks fluent English, he gives the impression that he's more comfortable speaking the Spanish he grew up with in Cuauhtemoc.