live within (one's) means

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live within (one's) means

To spend less or only as much money as one is earning or is able to pay in order avoid exceeding one's budget or going into debt. You need to start living within your means and avoid making so many frivolous purchases. Being so poor during college taught me how to live within my means.
See also: live, mean, within
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

live within one's means

to spend no more money than one has. We have to struggle to live within our means, but we manage. John is unable to live within his means.
See also: live, mean, within
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Discussing topics such as the growth mindset, the power of grit, trauma, and gratitude the reader will better understand: Voids in their lives; How they try to fill such voids (possibly with the purchasing of things); How to live within one's means after learning to be grateful.
Those rules were simple: Complete the task given to you or the one you have undertaken irrespective of how irksome it is; respect each other's property - however small and inconsequential it may seem; neither borrow nor lend in order to make a splash or appear wealthier than one actually is; learn to live within one's means; shun self-praise, reserve one's judgement, especially in public, and refrain from spouting all the stray thoughts that jump into your head - especially the derogatory and unkind ones.
Now, being unable to live within one's means is not unusual.
And most of all courage is needed to act boldly and in new ways, inspire others to do the same and, perhaps for the first time in generations, actually begin to live within one's means.
"Lazaretto'' ends with "Want and Able,'' a musical parable about the internal conflict between unfulfilled desires and being able to live within one's means. Sounding like the musings of an idealistic teenager (and they quite possibly are), this musical morality play is a little convoluted, even heavy-handed, but delivers a big payoff in the end, when an ivory-tickling, emotionally-wrought White reveals, "I want to see you, lie next to you/And touch you in my dreams/But that's not possible/Something simply will not let me.''
I strongly believe that the government should incorporate of moral education on how to combat corruption in the school curriculum while teaching them how to live within one's means.
It requires a discipline and commitment to live within one's means.