live paycheck to paycheck

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live paycheck to paycheck

To spend all of the money one earns by or before the next time one is paid, thus saving none or very little in the process. Primarily heard in US. We're already living paycheck to paycheck, so I don't know how we'll manage this sudden increase in our rent.
See also: live, paycheck
References in periodicals archive ?
If you don't have an extra source of income and you live paycheck to paycheck, the only way to save is to reduce your expenses.
workers were noticeably more likely to say they live paycheck to paycheck than the workers in the 11 other developed markets included.
And for people like Gonzalez, his dad and scores of neighbors who live paycheck to paycheck in a city that was built around cars, the lack of a vehicle is compounding the already daunting task of getting life back on track.
But what about those who live paycheck to paycheck and may not have the ability to stockpile toilet paper during a great sale?
Low-wage working people often live paycheck to paycheck.
We believe that many people who live paycheck to paycheck need access to credit that can help them manage their financial affairs," Cordray said.
Many families spend more than what they make every year and live paycheck to paycheck.
One reason for those who aren't may be that almost half of unretired US adults (46 percent) say they live paycheck to paycheck and can't afford to put money in savings.
Lower-income families may not have to live paycheck to paycheck or go without necessities.
Moreover, 49% of modern families say that they currently live paycheck to paycheck, versus 41% of traditional families, and 25% are not saving any money at all.
Many of these people live paycheck to paycheck, and now they have to buy water and they are not working.
This is why I understand that, in the economic climate such as the one we find ourselves in today, when many families live paycheck to paycheck, I understand the gripe, as well as the idea of how people can turn their backs on something they feel is simply too expensive.
The economic crisis won't hit the rich the hardest, but rather the people who live paycheck to paycheck.
For the most part, this may reflect the fact that many Americans who are paid on a semi-monthly or monthly basis -- like many who are paid weekly -- still live paycheck to paycheck.
Thirty percent of this demographic said they live paycheck to paycheck -- an uptick of 9 percent from last year.