live next door (to one)

(redirected from live next door to)

live next door (to one)

To live in a house, apartment, building, etc., that is immediately adjacent to one. There has been a family living next door to us for over a year, and we still have yet to meet them. My best friend lived next door until we both started high school, when she moved to a different part of the state.
See also: door, live, next

live next door (to someone)

to live in the house or dwelling next to someone. I live next door to John. John lives next door to me. John lives next door.
See also: door, live, next
References in periodicals archive ?
In related news, a source claimed earlier this week that Prince Harry and Markle doesn't want to live next door to Prince William and Kate Middleton.
"Failure and success live next door to each other and the doors have no number, you just knock and you don't know who is going to open.
This man was jailed for five years on 11 counts of exposure, three charges of possessing a prohibited firearm and seven other firearms offences, yet is still allowed to return to live next door to a lady who he petrified over a period of nine years.
Well, Mary Carr, he does live next door to people on either side of him.
I would love to live next door to her just to see how she lives her everyday, normal life."
She's described by some as the girl next door, but only if you live next door to an amusement park.
John Peberdy and Wally Shaw, who live next door to each other in Dwyran, have for years contested Anglesey Show's supreme honey title.
Mrs Hyett and hubby Neil, 35, live next door to Shannon's mum.
Nell (Samaire Armstrong) and Woody (Kevin Zegers) live next door to each other but are worlds apart.
Now that we have evolved and live next door to each other but somehow we have forgotten the original need that made us to come together.
In 1999, Kaufman sued to prevent investment bank Dean Kehler and his wife Elizabeth, who live next door to him, from building a concrete pier that muddied his shoreline by blocking the tides.
Because we live next door to people we never would have lived next door to in another era, and because we are much more involved with each other, religious pluralism is a part of our everyday reality today.
And then she added, "It's best to live next door to a Samaritan, because they make real good neighbors."