listen

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talk to the hand

A rude interjection meant to interrupt and dismiss what another person is saying. (Sometimes written or spoken in longer forms, such as, "talk to the hand, because the face isn't listening," or the like.) Dad: "Sarah, would you mind cleaning up the—" Sarah: "Talk to the hand, dad! I've got too much going on to be dealing with chores around the house!" All of us were aghast when Jonathan turned to the police officer and said, "Talk to the hand, 'cause the face ain't interested!"
See also: hand, talk

listen to reason

To listen to someone's rational assessment of a situation. Oh, I've tried talking to her about how dangerous her career is, but she just will not listen to reason.
See also: listen, reason

listen (to someone or something) with half an ear

To listen to someone or something intermittently or with only partial attention. Unfortunately, I don't remember what mom said because I was only listening with half an ear while the game was on TV. Who won? I was only listening to the radio with half an ear when they made the announcement.
See also: ear, half, listen, someone

I'm listening.

 and I'm all ears.
Inf. You have my attention, so you should talk. Bob: Look, old pal. I want to talk to you about something. Tom: I'm listening. Bill: I guess I owe you an apology. Jane: I'm all ears.
See also: listen

listen for someone or something

to try to hear someone or something. I will have to let you in the front door if you come home late. I will listen for you. I am listening for the telephone.
See also: listen

listen in

 (on someone or something)
1. to join someone or a group as a listener. The band is rehearsing. Let's go listen in on them. It won't hurt to listen in, will it?
2. to eavesdrop on someone. Please don't try to listen in on us. This is a private conversation. I am not listening in. I was here first. You are talking too loud.
See also: listen

listen to reason

to yield to a reasonable argument; to take the reasonable course. Please listen to reason, and don't do something you'll regret. She got into trouble because she wouldn't listen to reason.
See also: listen, reason

listen to someone or something

 
1. to pay attention to and hear someone or something. Listen to me! Hear what I have to say! I want to listen to his speech.
2. to heed someone, orders, or advice. Listen to me! Do what I tell you! You really should listen to his advice.
See also: listen

listen up

to listen carefully. (Usually a command.) Now, listen up! This is important. Listen up, you guys!
See also: listen, up

stop, look, and listen

to exercise caution, especially at street corners and railroad crossings, by stopping, looking to the left and to the right, and listening for approaching vehicles or a train. Sally's mother trained her to stop, look, and listen at every street corner. It is a good practice to stop, look, and listen at a railroad crossing.
See also: and, listen

listen in

1. Hear or overhear the conversation of others; eavesdrop. It is also put as listen in on, as in She listened in on her parents and learned they were planning a surprise party. [Early 1900s]
2. Tune in and listen to a broadcast, as in Were you listening in the other night when they played Beethoven's Fifth? [1920s]
See also: listen

listen to reason

Pay heed to sensible advice or argument, as in We can't let him rush into that job-it's time he listened to reason. [Mid-1700s]
See also: listen, reason

listen with half an ear

If you listen to someone or something with half an ear, you listen but do not give them your full attention. She listened to the news with half an ear as she cleaned the bathroom. Gigi listened with half an ear to Yussef and Bassil, who were talking about their school days.
See also: ear, half, listen

listen with half an ear

not give your full attention to someone or something.
See also: ear, half, listen

listen with half an ˈear

not listen with your full attention: I was watching television and listening with half an ear to what he was telling me. OPPOSITE: be all ears
See also: ear, half, listen

listen for

v.
To listen attentively to hear some sound; wait expectantly to hear something or someone: Listen for the doorbell—the pizza should be here soon.
See also: listen

listen in

v.
1. To listen to something or to someone conversing without participating in the conversation: It is rude to listen in on other people's conversations. We put our ears to the door and listened in.
2. To tune in and listen to a broadcast: Listen in next week to the conclusion of our jazz concert series!
See also: listen

listen up

v.
To pay attention closely; be attentive. Used chiefly as a command: Listen up—I'm only going to tell you this once! I want you to listen up and do what I tell you to do.
See also: listen, up

I’m listening

sent. Keep talking.; Make your explanation now. I’m sure there’s an explanation. Well, I’m listening.
See also: listen

listen up

in. to listen carefully. (Usually a command.) Now, listen up! This is important.
See also: listen, up

stop, look, and listen

Railroad crossing warning. Before the installation of gates and flashing lights, a road that crossed a railroad track had a post on which was an X. On the crossbars was written “stop look listen,” a phrase attributed to an anonymous engineer who through that immigrants who read only rudimentary English would be able to understand the three words and heed their warning. Now automatic devices warn motorists and pedestrians to be mindful of approaching trains.
See also: and, listen
References in periodicals archive ?
Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.
It's not difficult to listen to people you like or when the subject is interesting, or you're hearing welcomed remarks or information.
For medical professionals, failure to listen has been blamed as a cause for improper diagnosis or inadequate treatment (Nyquist, 1992; Underwood & Adler, 2005; Davis et al.
You [sic] tend to listen mindfully when a message is important to you, and also when someone you care about is speaking about a matter that is important to him or her" (Adler & Proctor, 2011, p.
When God tells Abraham everything that Sarah says to you, listen to her voice God did not say "you shall do," rather God said "listen.
When God tells Abraham to listen, He was saying to engage in conversation.
The teacher elicits a number of words from the students and listens to their initial hypotheses but does not offer "right" or "wrong" judgments.
The teacher does not judge as "right" or "wrong" when s/he listens to the initial guesses since the idea is to engage students in the listening activity through this initial individual stage.
Since his musical taste includes ``everything but rap,'' 51-year-old Slocum uses both services to listen to Christmas music, blues and classical.
Even doctors are now getting instruction in how to listen as part of their medical training.
According to recent studies, American adults listen at only 25 percent efficiency; most adult listeners are preoccupied, distracted and forgetful nearly 75 percent of the time (Hunsaker, 1990).
When I listen to music, I really listen to it - it's not just background.
If almost half our time is spent listening, and, since most people listen at the 25 percent level, imagine what you are missing.