listen to

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listen to

1. To pay close attention to the sounds someone or something is making. The doctor listened to her breathing to see how serious the infections was. Pop the hood of your car, and I'll listen to the engine to see if I can tell what's wrong.
2. To obey someone or something; to follow someone's or something's instructions. Please listen to your father, Jonah. You've got to listen to your body and realize when you need to take a break.
See also: listen
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

listen to someone or something

 
1. to pay attention to and hear someone or something. Listen to me! Hear what I have to say! I want to listen to his speech.
2. to heed someone, orders, or advice. Listen to me! Do what I tell you! You really should listen to his advice.
See also: listen
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in classic literature ?
But as she was listening to the wind she began to listen to something else.
That will help us to pass a few minutes, while waiting for eleven o'clock to-morrow evening....My dear little Christine!...Are you listening to me?...Tell me you love me!...
It was, in fact, solely to meet Prince Vasili that she had obtained an invitation to Anna Pavlovna's reception and had sat listening to the vicomte's story.
One of the most sincere forms of respect is actually listening to what another has to say - Bryant H.
The main purpose of the listening skills is to receive the message of the sender as much correctly as possible but students at their beginning stage very often face a lot of difficulties for the fulfillment of this purpose and there are also some hurdles in this process of communication because listening to the second language acquires a lot of mental effort and when a hurdle like noise come in its way so students face some difficulties to understand the actual pronunciation and when they listen to the actual pronunciation of those words then comes the issue of their vocabulary.
They discuss what great listeners do; barriers to listening; how emotions affect what is heard; listening with more empathy; being mindful of where one's attention is when listening; helping others share at a deeper level; listening to change someone's mind; defusing an emotionally charged conversation with a colleague; listening to help people change; how to deal with people who always vent; and managing the critical voices inside one's head.
For deep listening to occur, a family doctor cannot see more than six to eight patients in a day, 4-5 days/week
The technology also allows the students to complete the listening assignment after listening to the music selection, or during listening to the music selection.
I agree that no one can single handedly save the world, and everyone surely carries a baggage, but some deaths can easily be avoided if we imbibe the art of listening to people.
In addition, in using a medical metaphor of diagnosis, she links the tutor's listening to that of the medical practitioner: "Diagnosis [of writing issues] is a process that depends heavily on skilled listening and questioning" (p.
When it comes to listening to AM/FM radio, more than two-thirds of listening happens away from the home, when people are working or close to the point of purchase when they're shopping.
In fact, just a couple weeks ago, I booked an account by listening to a need mentioned on a social media channel.
Listening to works beyond the catalog of one's own instrument develops an awareness for instrumental and vocal timbres, cultivates mental and aural understanding of composers' styles, tendencies and inflections, and expands our musical sensibility to embrace a richer palette of sounds.
More specifically, in her discourses, I argue that Dworkin urges audiences to: acknowledge the complexities of listening to painful experiences while performing listening with forbearance and rigor; view listening as sacred and to enact listening with no expectation of personal gain; recognize that failing to listen enables oppressive structures to reproduce; listen to those who have "no claim" to speak; and recognize that personal stories have the potential to provide concrete knowledge that may serve as the basis of challenging social structures and motivating collective action.
In their now classic article, "Listening to People," which appeared in a 1957 issue of Harvard Business Review (HBR), authors Ralph Nichols and Leonard Stevens could not have been more direct in asserting that, "It can be stated, with practically no qualification, that people in general do not know how to listen." (1)