listen

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I'm listening

Used to emphasize that one is ready to hear or listen to someone or something. I'm listening—what really happened last night?
See also: listen

listen (to someone or something) with half an ear

To listen to someone or something intermittently or with only partial attention. Unfortunately, I don't remember what Mom said because I was only listening with half an ear while the game was on TV. Who won? I was only listening to the radio with half an ear when they made the announcement.
See also: ear, half, listen, someone

listen after (something)

obsolete To make inquiries about something. That troublesome fool Erhardt has been listening after the circumstances of the king's death. He may need to be eliminated as well.
See also: after, listen

listen for (someone or something)

To be and remain attentive so as to hear some sound. You listen for Mary's car so we can get in our places to surprise her. Could you please turn down your music? I'm trying to listen for the pizza delivery guy.
See also: listen

listen in (on someone or something)

1. To attend something so that one may listen to it without participating directly. The band is rehearsing in the studio next door, so I've been listening in during my lunch breaks. I'd like to go listen in on the lecture the professor is giving at the museum about early Modernism.
2. To listen to or overhear a conversation that one is not supposed to be a part of; to eavesdrop (on someone or something). Let's postpone this discussion until a later time—I think some people in the office are listening in. I wasn't trying to listen in on their argument, but they were speaking so loudly that it was impossible not to.
See also: listen, someone

listen out for (someone or something)

To be and remain attentive so as to hear some sound. Primarily heard in UK. You listen out for Mary's car so we can get in our places to surprise her. Could you please turn down your music? I'm listening out for the pizza delivery guy.
See also: listen, out

listen to

1. To pay close attention to the sounds someone or something is making. The doctor listened to her breathing to see how serious the infections was. Pop the hood of your car, and I'll listen to the engine to see if I can tell what's wrong.
2. To obey someone or something; to follow someone's or something's instructions. Please listen to your father, Jonah. You've got to listen to your body and realize when you need to take a break.
See also: listen

listen to reason

To listen to, understand, and be persuaded by a rational assessment of a situation. Oh, I've tried talking to her about how dangerous her career is, but she just will not listen to reason. Unfortunately, three-year-olds don't yet listen to reason.
See also: listen, reason

listen up

To begin paying attention and listening carefully (to someone or something). Usually said as a command. Listen up, Joe, this information concerns you as well. OK, listen up, everyone. We only have three hours to complete this project, so let's get to work.
See also: listen, up

social listening

In marketing, using a business's social media presence to learn what interests customers and how they view the business as a brand, with the goal of identifying trends that can be used to further the business in the future. A lot of big brands now engage in social listening and often end up offering products based on direct consumer suggestions.
See also: listen, social

stop, look, and listen

1. Literally, to stop before crossing a street or railroad, looking and listening to make sure no car or train is coming. Because we lived across the street from a huge park where we spent most of our time during the summers, our parents drilled it into us to always stop, look, and listen before crossing the road.
2. To exercise caution, prudence, or awareness in a dangerous, risky, or sensitive situation. We advise all our clients to stop, look, and listen before making any large investments like these. Just promise me that you'll always stop, look, and listen while you're traveling.
See also: and, listen

talk to the hand

A rude interjection meant to interrupt and dismiss what another person is saying. (Sometimes written or spoken in longer forms, such as, "talk to the hand, because the face isn't listening," or the like.) Dad: "Sarah, would you mind cleaning up the—" Sarah: "Talk to the hand, Dad! I've got too much going on to be dealing with chores around the house!" All of us were aghast when Jonathan turned to the police officer and said, "Talk to the hand, 'cause the face ain't interested!"
See also: hand, talk
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

I'm listening.

 and I'm all ears.
Inf. You have my attention, so you should talk. Bob: Look, old pal. I want to talk to you about something. Tom: I'm listening. Bill: I guess I owe you an apology. Jane: I'm all ears.
See also: listen

listen for someone or something

to try to hear someone or something. I will have to let you in the front door if you come home late. I will listen for you. I am listening for the telephone.
See also: listen

listen in

 (on someone or something)
1. to join someone or a group as a listener. The band is rehearsing. Let's go listen in on them. It won't hurt to listen in, will it?
2. to eavesdrop on someone. Please don't try to listen in on us. This is a private conversation. I am not listening in. I was here first. You are talking too loud.
See also: listen

listen to reason

to yield to a reasonable argument; to take the reasonable course. Please listen to reason, and don't do something you'll regret. She got into trouble because she wouldn't listen to reason.
See also: listen, reason

listen to someone or something

 
1. to pay attention to and hear someone or something. Listen to me! Hear what I have to say! I want to listen to his speech.
2. to heed someone, orders, or advice. Listen to me! Do what I tell you! You really should listen to his advice.
See also: listen

listen up

to listen carefully. (Usually a command.) Now, listen up! This is important. Listen up, you guys!
See also: listen, up

stop, look, and listen

to exercise caution, especially at street corners and railroad crossings, by stopping, looking to the left and to the right, and listening for approaching vehicles or a train. Sally's mother trained her to stop, look, and listen at every street corner. It is a good practice to stop, look, and listen at a railroad crossing.
See also: and, listen
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

listen in

1. Hear or overhear the conversation of others; eavesdrop. It is also put as listen in on, as in She listened in on her parents and learned they were planning a surprise party. [Early 1900s]
2. Tune in and listen to a broadcast, as in Were you listening in the other night when they played Beethoven's Fifth? [1920s]
See also: listen

listen to reason

Pay heed to sensible advice or argument, as in We can't let him rush into that job-it's time he listened to reason. [Mid-1700s]
See also: listen, reason
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

listen with half an ear

If you listen to someone or something with half an ear, you listen but do not give them your full attention. She listened to the news with half an ear as she cleaned the bathroom. Gigi listened with half an ear to Yussef and Bassil, who were talking about their school days.
See also: ear, half, listen
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

listen with half an ear

not give your full attention to someone or something.
See also: ear, half, listen
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

listen with half an ˈear

not listen with your full attention: I was watching television and listening with half an ear to what he was telling me. OPPOSITE: be all ears
See also: ear, half, listen
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

listen for

v.
To listen attentively to hear some sound; wait expectantly to hear something or someone: Listen for the doorbell—the pizza should be here soon.
See also: listen

listen in

v.
1. To listen to something or to someone conversing without participating in the conversation: It is rude to listen in on other people's conversations. We put our ears to the door and listened in.
2. To tune in and listen to a broadcast: Listen in next week to the conclusion of our jazz concert series!
See also: listen

listen up

v.
To pay attention closely; be attentive. Used chiefly as a command: Listen up—I'm only going to tell you this once! I want you to listen up and do what I tell you to do.
See also: listen, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

I’m listening

sent. Keep talking.; Make your explanation now. I’m sure there’s an explanation. Well, I’m listening.
See also: listen

listen up

in. to listen carefully. (Usually a command.) Now, listen up! This is important.
See also: listen, up
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

listen up

Pay attention, listen carefully. This slangy imperative probably originated in the armed forces during World War II and soon entered the civilian vocabulary. William Safire used it in a quotation, “I’m only going to say this once, so listen up” (New York Times Magazine, Sept. 28, 1980).
See also: listen, up
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer

stop, look, and listen

Railroad crossing warning. Before the installation of gates and flashing lights, a road that crossed a railroad track had a post on which was an X. On the crossbars was written “stop look listen,” a phrase attributed to an anonymous engineer who through that immigrants who read only rudimentary English would be able to understand the three words and heed their warning. Now automatic devices warn motorists and pedestrians to be mindful of approaching trains.
See also: and, listen
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
It will start by showing what the first song they listened to in 2018 was, as well.
This power becomes evident both in terms of being listened to, and listening to and for others, demonstrating the bidirectional, processural, and mutual nature of listening.
During interpersonal conversation, the importance of conveying the feeling that the speaker has been listened to cannot be overstated.
In his commentary, he focuses on the seemingly superfluous words because you have listened to the voice of your wife.
To avoid this situation, an effective franchisor should avoid the attempt to take control of the communication by talking, but rather should invite additional sharing by using such phrases as, "I would like to know what you are thinking", or "It sounds like you have an opinion about this topic, let's discuss that." The more opportunity the franchisee has to talk and be listened to without judgment, the lower the emotional level falls and chances of talking through the problem increase.
Like the daycare worker at the start of this column, when children have a good listening model to refer to-when they not only feel they are being heard but listened to as well-they are more likely to listen to others.
In addition, after they read the questions, they listened specifically for answers to the questions, implying that previewing questions affected their listening strategy.
The latest figures released yesterday from monitoring body Rajar covering a period from September 16 to December 16 also show a slight drop on the hours listened for some stations in the West Midlands.
Shortly after the Walkman was released in 1979, one history professor lamented that it was a menace that called "into existence still one more competitor to the voice of God." I, for one, rarely hear God's voice over the loudspeakers in the subway or on the blaring TV screens in the airport, but it's possible that I just never listened hard enough to the evangelical homeless man who used to ride my train on Tuesdays.
One of the most common traits I hear when people recount meetings with truly great leaders is that they "listened as if I was the only person in the world who mattered and were truly interested in what I was saying." Listening at that level is way beyond simply paying attention and using what trainers often call active listening skills.
I've listened to the albums and seven inches innumerable times, and every single time, something new hits me in your songs.
Here is a selective list of outstanding audios we listened to in 2005.
(Students were invited to sing along to the first third of the song as they listened.)
After their political crisis, Ukrainians need assistance in their transition; but most important, they need to be listened to.