listen


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talk to the hand

A rude interjection meant to interrupt and dismiss what another person is saying. (Sometimes written or spoken in longer forms, such as, "talk to the hand, because the face isn't listening," or the like.) Dad: "Sarah, would you mind cleaning up the—" Sarah: "Talk to the hand, dad! I've got too much going on to be dealing with chores around the house!" All of us were aghast when Jonathan turned to the police officer and said, "Talk to the hand, 'cause the face ain't interested!"
See also: hand, talk

listen to reason

To listen to a rational assessment of a situation. Oh, I've tried talking to her about how dangerous her career is, but she just will not listen to reason. Unfortunately, three-year-olds don't yet listen to reason.
See also: listen, reason

listen (to someone or something) with half an ear

To listen to someone or something intermittently or with only partial attention. Unfortunately, I don't remember what mom said because I was only listening with half an ear while the game was on TV. Who won? I was only listening to the radio with half an ear when they made the announcement.
See also: ear, half, listen, someone

listen out for (someone or something)

To be and remain attentive so as to hear some sound. Primarily heard in UK. You listen out for Mary's car so we can get in our places to surprise her. Could you please turn down your music? I'm listening out for the pizza delivery guy.
See also: listen, out

listen for (someone or something)

To be and remain attentive so as to hear some sound. You listen for Mary's car so we can get in our places to surprise her. Could you please turn down your music? I'm trying to listen for the pizza delivery guy.
See also: listen

listen in (on someone or something)

1. To join something in order to begin listening to it. The band is rehearsing in the studio next door, so I've been listening in on my lunch breaks. I'd to go listen in on the talk the professor is giving about early Modernism.
2. To listen to or overhear a conversation that one is not supposed to be a part of; to eavesdrop. Let's postpone this discussion until a later time—I think some people in the office are listening in on us. I wasn't trying to listen in on their argument, but they were speaking so loudly that it was impossible not to.
See also: listen, someone

listen up

To begin paying attention and listening carefully (to someone or something). Usually said as a command. Listen up, Joe, this information concerns you as well. OK, listen up, everyone. We only have three hours to complete this project, so let's get to work.
See also: listen, up

stop, look, and listen

1. Literally, to stop before crossing a street or railroad, looking and listening to make sure no car or train is coming. Because we lived across the street from a huge park where we spent most of our time during the summers, our parents drilled it into us to always stop, look, and listen before crossing the road.
2. To exercise caution, prudence, or awareness in a dangerous, risky, or sensitive situation. We advise all our clients to stop, look, and listen before making any large investments like these. Just promise me that you'll always stop, look, and listen while you're traveling.
See also: and, listen

social listening

In marketing, using a business's social media presence to learn what interests customers and how they view the business as a brand, with the goal of identifying trends that can be used to further the business in the future. A lot of big brands now engage in social listening and often end up offering products based on direct consumer suggestions.
See also: listen, social

I'm listening.

 and I'm all ears.
Inf. You have my attention, so you should talk. Bob: Look, old pal. I want to talk to you about something. Tom: I'm listening. Bill: I guess I owe you an apology. Jane: I'm all ears.
See also: listen

listen for someone or something

to try to hear someone or something. I will have to let you in the front door if you come home late. I will listen for you. I am listening for the telephone.
See also: listen

listen in

 (on someone or something)
1. to join someone or a group as a listener. The band is rehearsing. Let's go listen in on them. It won't hurt to listen in, will it?
2. to eavesdrop on someone. Please don't try to listen in on us. This is a private conversation. I am not listening in. I was here first. You are talking too loud.
See also: listen

listen to reason

to yield to a reasonable argument; to take the reasonable course. Please listen to reason, and don't do something you'll regret. She got into trouble because she wouldn't listen to reason.
See also: listen, reason

listen to someone or something

 
1. to pay attention to and hear someone or something. Listen to me! Hear what I have to say! I want to listen to his speech.
2. to heed someone, orders, or advice. Listen to me! Do what I tell you! You really should listen to his advice.
See also: listen

listen up

to listen carefully. (Usually a command.) Now, listen up! This is important. Listen up, you guys!
See also: listen, up

stop, look, and listen

to exercise caution, especially at street corners and railroad crossings, by stopping, looking to the left and to the right, and listening for approaching vehicles or a train. Sally's mother trained her to stop, look, and listen at every street corner. It is a good practice to stop, look, and listen at a railroad crossing.
See also: and, listen

listen in

1. Hear or overhear the conversation of others; eavesdrop. It is also put as listen in on, as in She listened in on her parents and learned they were planning a surprise party. [Early 1900s]
2. Tune in and listen to a broadcast, as in Were you listening in the other night when they played Beethoven's Fifth? [1920s]
See also: listen

listen to reason

Pay heed to sensible advice or argument, as in We can't let him rush into that job-it's time he listened to reason. [Mid-1700s]
See also: listen, reason

listen with half an ear

If you listen to someone or something with half an ear, you listen but do not give them your full attention. She listened to the news with half an ear as she cleaned the bathroom. Gigi listened with half an ear to Yussef and Bassil, who were talking about their school days.
See also: ear, half, listen

listen with half an ear

not give your full attention to someone or something.
See also: ear, half, listen

listen with half an ˈear

not listen with your full attention: I was watching television and listening with half an ear to what he was telling me. OPPOSITE: be all ears
See also: ear, half, listen

listen for

v.
To listen attentively to hear some sound; wait expectantly to hear something or someone: Listen for the doorbell—the pizza should be here soon.
See also: listen

listen in

v.
1. To listen to something or to someone conversing without participating in the conversation: It is rude to listen in on other people's conversations. We put our ears to the door and listened in.
2. To tune in and listen to a broadcast: Listen in next week to the conclusion of our jazz concert series!
See also: listen

listen up

v.
To pay attention closely; be attentive. Used chiefly as a command: Listen up—I'm only going to tell you this once! I want you to listen up and do what I tell you to do.
See also: listen, up

I’m listening

sent. Keep talking.; Make your explanation now. I’m sure there’s an explanation. Well, I’m listening.
See also: listen

listen up

in. to listen carefully. (Usually a command.) Now, listen up! This is important.
See also: listen, up

stop, look, and listen

Railroad crossing warning. Before the installation of gates and flashing lights, a road that crossed a railroad track had a post on which was an X. On the crossbars was written “stop look listen,” a phrase attributed to an anonymous engineer who through that immigrants who read only rudimentary English would be able to understand the three words and heed their warning. Now automatic devices warn motorists and pedestrians to be mindful of approaching trains.
See also: and, listen
References in periodicals archive ?
1), the instructor could have learners listen to the results of the survey.
Dworkin (2002) stated that she "learned to listen with concentration and poise to the women who would talk to me years later: the women who had been raped and prostituted; the women who had been battered; the women who had been incested as children" (p.
And most important, do you in fact listen to learn?
Focus on Research: We listen to a book a day; we speak a book a week: Learning from Walter Loban.
It changes the listening practice into a task-based activity in which students learn how to listen, rather than being tested.
tick all the answers that you agree with or add your own): a) listen to podcasts, b) listen to authentic cassette recordings in class, c) listen to peers in English classes, d) talk to the native speakers of English, e) watch English films on TV, f) other (specify).
Have staff listen and ask questions without making assertions of their own; i.
Posters of a "Give Me Five" hand can be drawn up by students and posted in the library and the classroom and referred to by the teacher-librarian when preparing students to listen.
Slocum is a CPA who lives in Walnut in the San Gabriel Valley and listens to satellite radio during his daily commute to El Segundo for work.
If it was just that, we'd all listen to classical music and call it a day.
The type of music I listen to most of the time is not commercial music, just for the simple fact that they're not helping the people uplift themselves," says Panama.
Wigglebottom Learns To Listen by Howard Binkow combines an original and entertaining story with engaging and colorful illustrations from Susan F.
Before you read beyond this first paragraph, take four or five minutes to do this simple exercise: stop and listen.
Walk into the new appointment with great humility, ears open to listen, listen, listen.
Although producing meaningful speech is a central aspect of L2 acquisition, learning actively to listen is an equally essential and closely-related skill to be encouraged in all students of foreign languages (Rivers 196, Omaggio Hadley 5-6, Lund 201).