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link whore

Internet slang (possibly offensive) A person who makes constant and conspicuous efforts to drive Internet traffic to their own webpage by posting links to it across other areas of the Internet. There are so many link whores filling this forum with garbage posts that it's become nearly unreadable.
See also: link, whore

link whoring

Internet slang (possibly offensive) The practice of making constant and conspicuous efforts to drive Internet traffic to one's own webpage by posting links to it across other areas of the Internet. The link whoring that goes on in this forum has made it nearly unreadable in recent times.
See also: link, whore

a chain is only as strong as its weakest link

If one part of something is weak, it jeopardizes the integrity, quality, or effectiveness of the whole. I need to make sure that everyone on our debate team is well-prepared, since a chain is only as strong as its weakest link.
See also: chain, link, strong, weak

missing link

1. A hypothetical extinct animal that is believed to be the evolutionary connection between man and ape. Scientists will never fully understand the evolution of man until they find the missing link.
2. Something that is significantly, noticeably absent, often because its presence would be helpful or beneficial. Participation is the missing link in your grade, so I would suggest speaking up in class going forward. I think that chlorine is the missing link in this experiment.
See also: link, missing

weak link

Someone or something considered inferior to the other parts of a group, series, or mechanism. The weak link in computer security is almost always the end user. Derek hardly ever comes to class, so I'm not surprised he was the weak link in our group project.
See also: link, weak

a chain is no stronger than its weakest link

If one part of something is weak, it jeopardizes the integrity, quality, or effectiveness of the whole. I need to make sure that everyone on our debate team is well-prepared, since a chain is no stronger than its weakest link. A chain is no stronger than its weakest link, and our security will not be effective if any of the checkpoints are not functioning.
See also: chain, link, strong, weak

chain is no stronger than its weakest link

Prov. A successful group or team relies on each member doing well. George is completely out of shape. I don't want him on our ball team; a chain is only as strong as its weakest link.
See also: chain, link, strong, weak

*contact with someone a link to someone

resulting in communication. (*Typically: be in ~; have ~; make~.) I have had no contact with Bill since he left town. Tom made contact with a known criminal last month.
See also: contact, link

link someone or something to someone or something

 and link someone or something and someone or something together; link someone or something together with someone or something ; link someone or something with someone or something
1. to discover a connection between people and things, in any combination. I would never have thought of linking Fred to Tom. I didn't even know they knew each other. I always sort of linked Tom with honesty.
2. to connect people and things, in any combination. We have to link each person to one other person, using this colored yarn to tie them together. We linked each decoration together with another one.
See also: link

link someone or something up (to something)

to connect someone or something to something, usually with something that has a type of fastener or connector that constitutes a link. They promised that they would link me up to the network today. They will link up my computer to the network today.
See also: link, up

link up to someone or something

 and link (up) with someone or something
to join up with someone or something. I have his new e-mail address so I can link up to Bruce. Now my computer can link up with a computer bulletin board.
See also: link, up

weak link (in the chain)

Fig. the weak point or person in a system or organization. Joan's hasty generalizations about the economy were definitely the weak link in her argument.
See also: link, weak

weak link

The least dependable member of a group, as in The shipping department, slow in getting out orders, is our weak link in customer service , or They're all very capable designers except for Ron, who is clearly the weak link. This expression alludes to the fragile portion of a chain, where it is most likely to break. [Mid-1800s]
See also: link, weak

a weak link

or

a weak link in the chain

COMMON If you describe someone or something as a weak link or a weak link in the chain, you mean that they are an unreliable part of a system or member of a group, and because of them the whole system or group may fail. It was automatically assumed that Edward would be the weak link in the partnership. Success comes from teamwork, and all it takes is one weak link in the chain to deny you the rewards of any amount of hard work. Note: People also say that someone or something is the weakest link if they are the most unreliable part of a system. He was the weakest link in the team's defence. Note: People sometimes say that a system is only as strong as its weakest link. A rail system is only as strong as its weakest link, as any commuter trapped behind a broken-down train can testify.
See also: link, weak

link up

v.
1. To collaborate or team up: The two minority parties linked up to oppose the ruling party. Two popular bands have linked up for a nationwide tour.
2. To introduce someone into a relationship or collaboration with others: Can you link me up with a good financial adviser? I linked them up last year and now they are partners. The convention links up buyers and sellers.
3. To join together: The two trains linked up to form one long train. This road links up with the highway in six miles.
4. To connect something with some other thing: We linked the trailer up to the truck. I linked up four extension cords and plugged the vacuum cleaner in. They linked the computers up so that they could share files.
5. To meet with someone, especially in order to do something: Let's link up next week and discuss the report. I linked up with my friends after the concert.
See also: link, up
References in periodicals archive ?
It's easy to change all links to a source workbook.
Links are increasingly being used in preference to content indexing, not only in search engines but, for instance, to identify communities of Web sites (Flake, Lawrence, Giles, & Coetzee, 2002), or, on a more local scale, to examine social networks and the transferral of memes between webloggers (Marlow, 2001-2002).
org Learn about the issues important to your elderly clients at the American Association of Retired Persons Web site, with links to legislative, research and money pages.
Round robin is a simple algorithm, but it guarantees that the traffic load is equally distributed across all the network links while minimizing CPU processing.
With Link 16, participants gain situational awareness by exchanging voice and digital data over a common communications link that is continuously and automatically updated in real time.
MedlinePlus includes liberal "See references," so more technical versions or synonyms become links in alphabetic topic lists.
CPAs and PFPs can find links to detailed tax preparation software reviews in the Personal Finance section of this site.
Not-for-profits (NPOs) (or "Free Associations") links to the Non-Profit Times, the Foundation Center and Thoughts on Fundraising.
By clicking on the link to share on Facebook, users can send direct links to games on Miniclip.
To create a link between two Windows applications, open the source application, select the original block of data and copy it to the Clipboard (using the Edit and Copy commands, as appropriate).
We are pleased that the Links Incorporated are celebrating their 60th anniversary in Philadelphia and with the assistance of the local chapter, we are also excited to serve as the host city," states Tom Muldoon, president, Philadelphia Convention & Visitors Bureau.
At its I/ITSEC booth, Link has multiple training entities - including a UH-60 flight simulator - networked together to undertake a mission as a combined force to safely extract a SEAL forward observer team from a potentially hostile urban setting.
5 tons of medical surplus to us in 2004," said Kathleen Hower, executive director, Global Links.
PITTSBURGH -- Pittsburgh based Acusis(R), a leading provider of quality medical transcription services to a national client base, announced today that it has donated $600,000 to Global Links, a Pittsburgh nonprofit organization that recovers unused healthcare supplies, equipment and furnishings for distribution to hospitals and clinics in developing countries.