link

(redirected from linking)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to linking: LinkedIn, dynamic linking

a chain is no stronger than its weakest link

proverb If one part of something is weak, it jeopardizes the integrity, quality, or effectiveness of the whole. I need to make sure that everyone on our debate team is well-prepared, since a chain is no stronger than its weakest link. A chain is no stronger than its weakest link, and our security will not be effective if any of the checkpoints are not functioning.
See also: chain, link, no, strong, weak

a chain is only as strong as its weakest link

If one part of something is weak, it jeopardizes the integrity, quality, or effectiveness of the whole. I need to make sure that everyone on our debate team is well-prepared, since a chain is only as strong as its weakest link.
See also: chain, link, strong, weak

contact with (one)

Communication with one. Has anyone had contact with Grandma since the storm hit?
See also: contact

link (someone or something) up to (someone or something)

To create or establish a connection between one person or thing and someone or something else. In this usage, the first noun or pronoun can also come after "up." I can link up our computer to the company database over the internet. They linked me up to a machine that monitored my brain activity.
See also: link, up

link farm

A group of websites that all link to each other, so as to increase their SEO value. Are link farms considered a form of spam?
See also: farm, link

link in the chain

One of the steps, stages, or points in a development, process, or series of events. This new tram line is but one link in the chain of our greater plan to update the city's public transportation system. It was the deregulation of the market that proved to be the most crucial link in the chain of the eventual economic meltdown.
See also: chain, link

link rot

The process by which Internet links on a website or search engine lead to a URL that is no longer available. A word of advice to any up-and-coming bloggers or Internet writers in general—don't litter your writing with links to external sources because link rot will inevitably set in.
See also: link, rot

link to (someone or something)

1. To have a connection with someone or something. The sudden reversal in policy seems to link to pressure put on the administration by several large lobby groups. I only found out recently that our family tree links to George Washington!
2. To connect multiple people or things physically to one another. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "link" and "to." We linked each child's leg to their neighbor's with a bandana for the three-legged race. Link each paper hoop to the next in order to create a chain.
3. To find, discover, or establish a connection between multiple people or things. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "link" and "to." Often used in passive constructions. There's nothing linking me to their criminal activities! Long-term use of the medication has been linked to heart failure, respiratory issues, and muscular atrophy. I can link our computer to the company database over the internet.
See also: link

link together (with someone or something)

1. To have a connection with someone or something. We're sisters, so we're forever linked together! Don't you think it's dangerous that the whole economy is linked together with the financial performance of a single company?
2. To connect multiple people or things physically to one another. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "link" and "together." We linked the children's legs together using a bandana for their three-legged race. Link each paper hoop together with the next one in order to create a chain.
3. To find, discover, or establish a connection between multiple people or things. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "link" and "together." Often used in passive constructions. There's nothing linking Paul together with the murder weapon. Nothing! An outbreak of hives has now been linked together with other allergic reactions to the drug.
See also: link, someone, together

link up

1. To join with or connect to something. These two toys link up to create a super-sized robot. According to the map, the creek should link up with the main river about a mile from here.
2. To connect two or more things together. In this usage, noun or pronoun can be used between "link" and "up." If you link up the monitors, you can have each spreadsheet open at full size on each screen. Just link your phones up over Bluetooth and share the data wirelessly.
3. To meet with someone. I'm linking up with the teaching assistant this Tuesday to go over my test results. I'd love to pick your brain about new ideas for our next project. Let's link up sometime next week!
4. To join someone or a group to form a team, association, partnership. They should definitely link up—I think their two companies would be really well suited to each other. By linking up with the foreign distribution company, we've been able to quadruple our sales in under a year. If we linked up, we could solve this crime in no time.
5. To introduce two or more people; to join two or more people together into a team, association, or partnership. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "link" and "up." I'm going to link you up with my tax adviser—she should be able to help you with your problem. My job is to link companies up with a PR representative who fits their day-to-day needs. I've been trying to link you two up for years—I think you'd be perfect for each other!
See also: link, up

link up with (someone or something)

1. To make contact with another person. I'm going to link up with my friends after we're finished eating dinner, if that's all right. You should definitely link up with Nancy while you're in Tokyo.
2. To create or establish a connection to something else. I linked up with the company database to retrieve the documents that I need. The TV is just trying to link up with the Internet.
3. To create or establish a connection between one person or thing and someone or something else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used before or after "up." I can link my phone up with yours so that it sends you any photos that I take automatically. They linked me up with a machine that monitored my brain activity.
See also: link, up

link whore

rude slang A person who makes constant and conspicuous efforts to drive Internet traffic to their own webpage by posting links to it across other areas of the Internet. Potentially offensive. There are so many link whores filling this forum with garbage posts that it's become nearly unreadable.
See also: link, whore

link whoring

rude slang The practice of making constant and conspicuous efforts to drive Internet traffic to one's own webpage by posting links to it across other areas of the Internet. Potentially offensive. The link whoring that goes on in this forum has made it nearly unreadable in recent times.
See also: link, whore

link with (someone or something)

1. To make contact with another person. I'm going to link with my friends after we're finished eating dinner, if that's all right. You should definitely link with Nancy while you're in Tokyo.
2. To create or establish a connection to something else. I linked with the company database to retrieve the documents that I need. The TV is just trying to link with the Internet.
3. To create or establish a connection between one person or thing and someone or something else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "link" and "with." I can link my phone with yours so that it sends you any photos that I take automatically. They linked me with a machine that monitored my brain activity.
See also: link

missing link

1. A hypothetical extinct animal that is believed to be the evolutionary connection between man and ape. Scientists will never fully understand the evolution of man until they find the missing link.
2. Something that is significantly, noticeably absent, often because its presence would be helpful or beneficial. Participation is the missing link in your grade, so I would suggest speaking up in class going forward. I think that chlorine is the missing link in this experiment.
See also: link, missing

weak link

Someone or something considered inferior to the other parts of a group, series, or mechanism. The weak link in computer security is almost always the end user. Derek hardly ever comes to class, so I'm not surprised he was the weak link in our group project.
See also: link, weak
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

chain is no stronger than its weakest link

Prov. A successful group or team relies on each member doing well. George is completely out of shape. I don't want him on our ball team; a chain is only as strong as its weakest link.
See also: chain, link, no, strong, weak

*contact with someone a link to someone

resulting in communication. (*Typically: be in ~; have ~; make~.) I have had no contact with Bill since he left town. Tom made contact with a known criminal last month.
See also: contact, link

link someone or something to someone or something

 and link someone or something and someone or something together; link someone or something together with someone or something ; link someone or something with someone or something
1. to discover a connection between people and things, in any combination. I would never have thought of linking Fred to Tom. I didn't even know they knew each other. I always sort of linked Tom with honesty.
2. to connect people and things, in any combination. We have to link each person to one other person, using this colored yarn to tie them together. We linked each decoration together with another one.
See also: link

link someone or something up (to something)

to connect someone or something to something, usually with something that has a type of fastener or connector that constitutes a link. They promised that they would link me up to the network today. They will link up my computer to the network today.
See also: link, up

link up to someone or something

 and link (up) with someone or something
to join up with someone or something. I have his new e-mail address so I can link up to Bruce. Now my computer can link up with a computer bulletin board.
See also: link, up

weak link (in the chain)

Fig. the weak point or person in a system or organization. Joan's hasty generalizations about the economy were definitely the weak link in her argument.
See also: link, weak
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

weak link

The least dependable member of a group, as in The shipping department, slow in getting out orders, is our weak link in customer service , or They're all very capable designers except for Ron, who is clearly the weak link. This expression alludes to the fragile portion of a chain, where it is most likely to break. [Mid-1800s]
See also: link, weak
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

a weak link

or

a weak link in the chain

COMMON If you describe someone or something as a weak link or a weak link in the chain, you mean that they are an unreliable part of a system or member of a group, and because of them the whole system or group may fail. It was automatically assumed that Edward would be the weak link in the partnership. Success comes from teamwork, and all it takes is one weak link in the chain to deny you the rewards of any amount of hard work. Note: People also say that someone or something is the weakest link if they are the most unreliable part of a system. He was the weakest link in the team's defence. Note: People sometimes say that a system is only as strong as its weakest link. A rail system is only as strong as its weakest link, as any commuter trapped behind a broken-down train can testify.
See also: link, weak
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

the weak link

the point at which a system, sequence, or organization is most vulnerable; the least dependable element or member.
See also: link, weak
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

a link in the ˈchain

one of the stages in a process or a line of argument: Many people believe that coming from a broken home may be one of the first links in the chain that eventually leads to a life of crime.
See also: chain, link

the weak ˈlink (in the ˈchain)

the point at which a system or an organization is most likely to fail: She went straight for the one weak link in the chain of his argument.
See also: link, weak
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

link up

v.
1. To collaborate or team up: The two minority parties linked up to oppose the ruling party. Two popular bands have linked up for a nationwide tour.
2. To introduce someone into a relationship or collaboration with others: Can you link me up with a good financial adviser? I linked them up last year and now they are partners. The convention links up buyers and sellers.
3. To join together: The two trains linked up to form one long train. This road links up with the highway in six miles.
4. To connect something with some other thing: We linked the trailer up to the truck. I linked up four extension cords and plugged the vacuum cleaner in. They linked the computers up so that they could share files.
5. To meet with someone, especially in order to do something: Let's link up next week and discuss the report. I linked up with my friends after the concert.
See also: link, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
It extends i/Lytics' capabilities to the Web for real-time data quality and linking processing.
For more than 30 years, enterprise-class companies have relied on Innovative's data quality and linking software, systems integration, database solutions and third-party reviews of customer data.
Through the code assignment or linking in specification 2, the system detects changes in the retention period before recalculating the destruction date.
But any linking and knotting of these lines gets in the way, limiting how much the system can "relax" and setting a lower bound on its energy.
Arnold, who showed that energy bounds exist for the special case when a quantity called the "linking number" can be computed for a given tangle of lines.
The database becomes a more powerful tool with the versatility and speed of linking information available in hypermedia.
One overriding linking structure will reduce the cognitive burden and allow the learner to concentrate on the content rather than on how to move within the Web page and the database.
That company is developing a high-speed network for linking fast computers.
Since 1971, James Lacey and his colleagues at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have been acquiring somewhat different but related chemical evidence linking anti-codons and amino acids to the development of the genetic code and to protein synthesis.
* IF THAT'S NOT ENOUGH, by linking the two files--the data file in Access to the one in Excel--any change you make in the original Access data will flow through to the Excel file.
So linking the two applications produces one powerful tool.
The home page provides a table of contents linking to the firm's staff and services, a wide variety of other Internet connections and "a lighter look at life."
Data linking creates live data links between applications so the shared data can be updated, in real time, when data in either program change.
Linking data in Windows applications uses the Clipboard and Dynamic Data Exchange (DDE) features to let one Windows application create and insert objects (such as graphs or ranges of values from a spreadsheet) from another Windows application.
Full browser ?