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link up

1. To join with or connect to something. These two toys link up to create a super-sized robot. According to the map, the creek should link up with the main river about a mile from here.
2. To connect two or more things together. In this usage, noun or pronoun can be used between "link" and "up." If you link up the monitors, you can have each spreadsheet open at full size on each screen. Just link your phones up over Bluetooth and share the data wirelessly.
3. To meet with someone. I'm linking up with the teaching assistant this Tuesday to go over my test results. I'd love to pick your brain about new ideas for our next project. Let's link up sometime next week!
4. To join someone or a group to form a team, association, partnership. They should definitely link up—I think their two companies would be really well suited to each other. By linking up with the foreign distribution company, we've been able to quadruple our sales in under a year. If we linked up, we could solve this crime in no time.
5. To introduce two or more people; to join two or more people together into a team, association, or partnership. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "link" and "up." I'm going to link you up with my tax adviser—she should be able to help you with your problem. My job is to link companies up with a PR representative who fits their day-to-day needs. I've been trying to link you two up for years—I think you'd be perfect for each other!
See also: link, up

link to (someone or something)

1. To have a connection with someone or something. The sudden reversal in policy seems to link to pressure put on the administration by several large lobby groups. I only found out recently that our family tree links to George Washington!
2. To connect multiple people or things physically to one another. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "link" and "to." We linked each child's leg to their neighbor's with a bandana for the three-legged race. Link each paper hoop to the next in order to create a chain.
3. To find, discover, or establish a connection between multiple people or things. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "link" and "to." Often used in passive constructions. There's nothing linking me to their criminal activities! Long-term use of the medication has been linked to heart failure, respiratory issues, and muscular atrophy. I can link our computer to the company database over the internet.
See also: link

link up with (someone or something)

1. To make contact with another person. I'm going to link up with my friends after we're finished eating dinner, if that's all right. You should definitely link up with Nancy while you're in Tokyo.
2. To create or establish a connection to something else. I linked up with the company database to retrieve the documents that I need. The TV is just trying to link up with the Internet.
3. To create or establish a connection between one person or thing and someone or something else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used before or after "up." I can link my phone up with yours so that it sends you any photos that I take automatically. They linked me up with a machine that monitored my brain activity.
See also: link, up

link (someone or something) up to (someone or something)

To create or establish a connection between one person or thing and someone or something else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used before or after "up." I can link up our computer to the company database over the internet. They linked me up to a machine that monitored my brain activity.
See also: link, up

link someone or something up (to something)

to connect someone or something to something, usually with something that has a type of fastener or connector that constitutes a link. They promised that they would link me up to the network today. They will link up my computer to the network today.
See also: link, up

link up

v.
1. To collaborate or team up: The two minority parties linked up to oppose the ruling party. Two popular bands have linked up for a nationwide tour.
2. To introduce someone into a relationship or collaboration with others: Can you link me up with a good financial adviser? I linked them up last year and now they are partners. The convention links up buyers and sellers.
3. To join together: The two trains linked up to form one long train. This road links up with the highway in six miles.
4. To connect something with some other thing: We linked the trailer up to the truck. I linked up four extension cords and plugged the vacuum cleaner in. They linked the computers up so that they could share files.
5. To meet with someone, especially in order to do something: Let's link up next week and discuss the report. I linked up with my friends after the concert.
See also: link, up
References in periodicals archive ?
Once a linked cell is located, it can be edited or deleted by the methods described above.
Although this method removes all links quickly and easily, it also changes all formulas--not just the linked ones--to values.
The authors suggest in their article that linked items would be beneficial in "computerized testing".
Although in the past linked items have been used on two of eleven grade twelve examinations (diploma examinations) produced by the Learner Assessment Branch (formerly Student Evaluation Branch), due to the fundamental problems associated with linked items they are being removed from all future diploma examinations.
After all, it is the computer scoring algorithm that makes linked items soft-linked; hence the name.
This method of scoring linked items makes for an attractive item format to assess higher cognitive skills without the statistical pitfalls inherent in the conventional scoring of linked items.
You can limit the range of the cells to be linked (by listing the range coordinates or range name) and choose whether to bring in the data as common text or as a table.