lingua franca


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lingua franca

Any language used to bridge the gap between people who do not speak the same language. English is the lingua franca in many foreign tourist destinations.
See also: Franca, lingua

a ˌlingua ˈfranca

(from Italian) a shared language that is used for communication by people whose main languages are different: In the middle of the 20th century, English became the lingua franca of the world.The majority of our group being South American, we used Spanish as a lingua franca.
See also: Franca, lingua
References in periodicals archive ?
(53) In a Nordic study, (54) it was shown that Finnish writers tend to be more direct than Swedes in English lingua franca email messages; yet, professional communication works.
Hence, 'Lingua Franca' became a complex love story of two immigrants from very disparate backgrounds.'
If we take the idea of the Uralic languages originating in an auxiliary language, a lingua franca, as an example it is obvious that very little has actually been presented to support this idea, rather it is the idea itself that is constantly being put forward, not the evidence.
* XBRL, EXTENSIBLE BUSINESS REPORTING LANGUAGE, soon will be the lingua franca for all business reporting--from issuing financial statements to banks and shareholders to filing 10-Ks with the SEC or uploading business information onto a Web site.
The basis of application and information integration in the engine is the Extensible Markup Language (XML), which is rapidly becoming the lingua franca of business computing.
Based on the rapidly emerging XML standard, the lingua franca of e-commerce, and written in Java, the Netfish XDI System goes far beyond existing e-commerce solutions by quickly integrating with existing back-office ERP systems and making it easy to automate and manage workflows for complex B2B transactions between trading partners with different applications, formats and systems.
Last summer, at the height of the Campus Freethought Alliance's "Summer Workfest," CFA leaders were joined in Amherst, New York, by Emily Nussbaum, a feature writer for Lingua Franca magazine, which covers trends--and news of the wacky and wild--in academia and on college campuses.
For a trenchant account of some of the generational politics that lay behind the latest writings on the sixties, see Rick Perlsrein, "Who Owns the Sixties?: The Opening of a Scholarly Generation Gap," Lingua Franca (May/June, 1996), pp.
Her research supports the view that English is the lingua franca, the communicative medium of choice globally: It is used in at least 80 percent of computer-associated or -generated communications worldwide today...
"It is not too much to say," wrote Russell Sizemore, "that for a brief moment just war rhetoric served as the lingua franca of American moral reflection." Indeed, the sight of government and military officials, politicians, educators, and pundits taking seriously a moral tradition rooted in Christianity was striking.
His story begins with the creation of a national language, emerging out of a lingua franca that belongs to no-one as a first language, promoted in one form by Dutch colonialists and in another by traders or journalists and rally speakers.
Extending this theoretical contribution, Albrechtsen and Jacob conceptualize information in another inherently spatial fashion, that of information ecologies.(1) They note that classification systems play a key role as boundary objects (Star & Griesemer, 1989) in the organizations in which they are used--i.e., they serve simultaneously as lingua franca and as specialized tools in particular domains.
The earliest extant Greek translation of the Old Testament from the original Hebrew, presumably made for the use of the Jewish community in Egypt when Greek was the lingua franca throughout the region.
Conducted by international Resource Developments (IRD) of Norwalk, Connecticut, the report argues that, if Ada is to become the lingua franca of commercial as well as military software interests, it must compete with already established languages and conquer commercial markets.
Linguistics and language specialists from Europe, Australia, Brazil, and Thailand present 14 essays that examine the relationship between English as a lingua franca and pedagogy, teacher education, language development materials, testing, policymaking, English language learners, and other areas, with an emphasis on how English as a foreign language teachers can use English as lingua franca theories and research in classrooms.