lines


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

line

1. A series of words, as in a conversation, poem, song, etc. He fed the reporters some line about being dedicated to the average worker, but we all know that's a lie. Our songs are really collaborative efforts, and we usually toss lines back and forth to see what fits the song best.
2. slang A line of a powdered drug, especially cocaine, meant to be inhaled through one's nose. I walked in to find them snorting lines of coke off our living room table. I started out doing a line or two in the morning to help pick me up for work, but then I slowly found myself needing to keep doing throughout the day.

lines

n. words; conversation. (see also line.) We tossed some lines back and forth for a while and then split.
See also: line
References in classic literature ?
233, to go no further afield than earlier lines of the same book, give sufficient authority for [Greek], but the
These lines in the "Iliad" tell of the preparation for washing the body of Patroclus, and I am not pleased that the writer of the "Odyssey" should have adopted them here.
"Big Alec has a Chinese line out in the bight off Turner's Shipyard," Charley Le Grant said that afternoon to Carmintel.
Slack water had come, and as we dropped around the end of the Solano Wharf we saw Big Alec at work, running his line and removing the fish.
A wave of derisive laughter runs abreast of him all along the line. But how handsome he is!
A thin line of skirmishers, the men deployed at six paces or so apart, now pushes from the wood into the open.
SOCRATES: And are there not here four equal lines which contain this space?
SOCRATES: And now try and tell me the length of the line which forms the side of that double square: this is two feet--what will that be?
A little later the regiment was ordered out of line to relieve the congested front, and through some misplay in the game of battle was not again under fire.
"I have just come from behind the German lines. Possibly I can help you."
"Is it more difficult than entering the British lines?" asked Tarzan.
Prince Andrew, having reached the front line, rode along it.
The soldiers forming the picket line, like showmen exhibiting a curiosity, no longer looked at the French but paid attention to the sight-seers and grew weary waiting to be relieved.
"I should like to see him pull the wrong line," murmured George, as they passed.
Their line gets hitched across your mast, and overturns you, or it catches somebody in the boat, and either throws them into the water, or cuts their face open.