lines


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lines

n. words; conversation. (see also line.) We tossed some lines back and forth for a while and then split.
See also: line
References in classic literature ?
Exactly one-half of the second page is occupied with an opera criticism, fifty-three lines (three of them being headlines), and "Death Notices," ten lines.
One of these paragraphs tells about a quarrel between the Czar of Russia and his eldest son, twenty-one and a half lines; and the other tells about the atrocious destruction of a peasant child by its parents, forty lines, or one-fifth of the total of the reading-matter contained in the paper.
While now the fated Pequod had been so long afloat this voyage, the log and line had but very seldom been in use.
The Manxman took the reel, and holding it high up, by the projecting handle-ends of the spindle, round which the spool of line revolved, so stood with the angular log hanging downwards, till Ahab advanced to him.
Furthermore, lines two and three, four and five, six and seven, have the same tones on the even syllables.
36} The lines which I have enclosed in brackets are evidently an afterthought--added probably by the writer herself--for they evince the same instinctively greater interest in anything that may concern a woman, which is so noticeable throughout the poem.
The remarkable thing about such a line is the hook.
Two or three aides detach themselves from the group and canter away into the woods, along the lines in each direction.
Points, Lines, Squares, Cubes, Extra-Cubes -- we are all liable to the same errors, all alike the Slaves of our respective Dimensional prejudices, as one of your Spaceland poets has said,'One touch of Nature makes all worlds akin'.
SOCRATES: And these lines which I have drawn through the middle of the square are also equal?
In the first faint gray of the morning, when the swarming advance had paused to resume something of definition as a line of battle, and skirmishers had been thrown forward, word was passed along to call the roll.
Presently, as he passed through a clump of bushes, he came to the edge of a low cliff and saw upon a ledge some fifteen feet below him a German soldier prone behind an embankment of loose rock and leafy boughs that hid him from the view of the British lines.
After passing a chasseur regiment and in the lines of the Kiev grenadiers- fine fellows busy with similar peaceful affairs- near the shelter of the regimental commander, higher than and different from the others, Prince Andrew came out in front of a platoon of grenadiers before whom lay a naked man.
They both get hold of the same bit of line, and pull at it in opposite directions, and wonder where it is caught.
To discover the names in this and the following poem read the first letter of the first line in connection with the second letter of the second line, the third letter of the third line, the fourth of the fourth and so on to the end.