line (something) with (something)

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line (something) with (something)

To cover or fill the inner surface of something with some other material, substance, or objects. I lined my coat with wool to keep me warm in the winter. It turns out that the previous owners had lined the walls with asbestos, so we had to gut the entire building. These greedy merchants are just looking for ways to line their pockets with gold.
See also: line
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

line something with something

to place a layer of something over the inside surface of something. You should line the drawers with clean paper before you use them. I want to line this jacket with new material.
See also: line
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The furnaces were lined with a dry vibrated silica ([SiO.sub.2]) refractory grain bonded with boron oxide ([B.sub.2][O.sub.3]), which at the time, was introduced in the form of boric acid ([H.sub.3][BO.sub.4]).
The life of an inductor lined with these refractories was a function of how long it took the inductor lining to wear or to build-up.
PHOTO : Both hot- and cold-patch repairs can be made to the bull ladle, which is lined with the