line (one's) (own) pocket(s)

(redirected from line their pocket)

line (one's) (own) pocket(s)

To make a large amount of money for oneself in a way that is considered greedy or dishonest. The phrase typically implies that one is prioritizing making money above some other, more admirable goal. He doesn't care about creating some digital utopia—he's just trying to line his own pockets. This new contract is going to line our pockets for years.
See also: line

line one's own pocket(s)

Fig. to make money for oneself in a greedy or dishonest fashion. They are interested in lining their pockets first and serving the people second. You can't blame them for wanting to line their own pockets.
See also: line, own, pocket

line one's pockets

Accept a bribe or other illicit payment, as in The mayor and his cronies found dozens of ways to line their pockets. This expression dates from the mid-1500s, when it was also put as line one's purse.
See also: line, pocket

line your pockets

COMMON If someone lines their pockets, they make a lot of money in a dishonest or unfair way. He has been lining his pockets for 27 years while his country has been in poverty. Morris lined his own pockets with most of the cash, buying a Mercedes Benz, jewelry and paying off credit card debts as well. Note: You can also say that someone lines another person's pockets. This is a government that ignores the needs of the majority in order to line the pockets of the favoured few.
See also: line, pocket

line your pocket (or pockets)

make money, usually by dishonest means.
See also: line, pocket

line your (own)/somebody’s ˈpocket(s)

(informal) make a lot of money dishonestly, especially by stealing it from your employer: He’d been lining his pockets for years before it was discovered.
See also: line, pocket

line one’s own pocket

verb
See also: line, own, pocket

line one’s own pocket(s)

tv. to make money for oneself in a greedy or dishonest fashion. They are interested in lining their pockets first and serving the people second.
See also: line, own, pocket

line (one's) pockets

To make a profit, especially by illegitimate means.
See also: line, pocket
References in periodicals archive ?
So yet again as the speculators line their pockets, it is us car drivers, van drivers and businesses who are paying through the nose at the pumps.
"Its operators line their pockets by exploiting works without paying a penny to the people who created them."
I firmly believe that some of our football clubs are being used for individuals to line their pockets.
Nineteenth-century Irish entrepreneurs William Burke (Simon Pegg) and William Hare (Andy Serkis) are always looking for quick and easy ways to line their pockets and a chance encounter with beautiful actress Ginny (Isla Fisher) leads to a stunning revelation.
So while BG fat cats line their pockets, the hard-up must choose heating.
Watching these greedy bankers line their pockets with our tax money is like being mugged in broad daylight.
POLICE are warning residents that con artists could be targeting their homes in a bid to line their pockets.
We need a root and branch clear out of those MPs who use their position to line their pockets and make the whole lot fully accountable to tax payers.
As a member and lifelong fan I feel betrayed to endure such treatment - loyalty to the club I've followed so passionately means nothing - their only thought is how to further line their pockets.
How can we be nice to people who want to send pregnant women again to back-alley butchers, to people who want to take away necessary rights, and to people who line their pockets and the pockets of their friends through policies that are destroying the fragile ecology of our only planetary home?
Fat cats must not be able to line their pockets by cutting wages.
We've spent all these yearsas two totally separate entities and now they want to join us as some big happy family so they can line their pockets through our heritage.
Yet, while we may be in thrall to apparently implacable forces, however much fashionable architects line their pockets with cringing subservience.
Then he refers to those who prefer to line their pockets with profits from the residues of Washington's once-great forests as "professionals" who practice "successful management" and who now must rely upon "natural processes" (for example, arson?) to undue the "mistakes" of those who tried to save a scrap of something for posterity.
While the city is run badly people will line their pockets."