lime

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in the limelight

At the center of attention. The phrase refers to a type of lamp that was previously used in theatrical stage lighting. My sister loves being in the limelight, but I get really nervous on stage. Once news of this scandal breaks, our company will be in the limelight for months. He handles the financial side of the business, but he prefers not to be in the limelight when it comes to promotions and marketing.
See also: limelight

limejuicer

1. obsolete A British sailor, so called because of the Royal Navy's practice of adding lime juice to grog in order to combat scurvy. Primarily heard in US. A ship full of limejuicers just arrived into port where they met an icy reception from the locals.
2. dated By extension, any British person, especially an Englishman. The term is usually used in a derogatory manner. Primarily heard in US. We don't need some hoity-toity limejuicer coming in and telling us how to run our business. Why don't you go back to Britannia, you old limejuicer?
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

in the limelight

Also, in the spotlight. At the center of public attention or notoriety. For example, John loves being in the limelight, or The reporters made sure the attractive new actress would be in the spotlight. Both terms come from the theater and allude to focusing light on an important person, the first from a lighting device used from about 1840 on, the second from the early 1900s. Also see in the public eye; steal the show.
See also: limelight
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

limejuicer

and limey
n. a British sailor; and British citizen, typically a male. (The first one is old. Both are a little derogatory.) Some limey answered the telephone and I could hardly understand what she was saying.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

in the limelight

In the center of public attention. The term comes from a vivid lighting device used in theaters from about 1840 on to throw a strong light on the star of a performance. Relying on the combustion of oxygen and hydrogen on a surface of lime and a lens for directing the light, it was invented in 1826 by Thomas Drummond. George Bernard Shaw, in a letter concerning a controversy about censorship (ca. 1900), wrote, “Look after the limelight, and the play will look after itself.”
See also: limelight
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
In this report, we present a case of Mirrizi syndrome (Limy bile) caused by pure calcium carbonate stones which is a rare presentation.
Expenses on initial and repeated colorings were defined by GESN tables: table 62-19 "Coloring the earlier painted facades using limy structures" (column 62-19-1), table 62-21 "Oil coloring of earlier painted facades" (column 62-22-7), table 62-26 "Coloring paintings on the prepared surface of facades" (column 62-26-10).
If( t limy >= corn.cwidth ){ The tower t is feasible to arrange on the corner corn.
We quickly developed a dislike for the "Limy" as we called them.
very dry limy sites and was nearly as important as Andropogon gerardii
At the beginning of Velise time the sedimentation rate, carbon flux, and oxygen utilization decreased, causing the formation of red clays replacing the greyish limy sediments of the Rumba Formation.
1993), a dextral terrane boundary marked by tectonic melange, juxtaposes the Badger and Botwood groups against Silurian limestone and limy coralline siltstone of the Indian Islands Group (Currie 1995).
Daphnes need to be grown in fertile, well-drained and ideally, limy, soil in sun or partial shade.
Dramatically limy, precise, and sensational--a steal.
7 6 5 4 3 OLYMPIC -C= IMPLOY -0= IMPLY -M= PILY -I= PLY< -L= LIP< -P= LIMY -Y= MIL< -Y= LIMP -L= IMP< -P= mil< -I= COMPLY< -L= MYOPIC< -M= POLICY -0= PYLIC -C= pily> -L= PYIC -P= ICY< -Y= PIC< -Y= CLIP -C= lip> -L= pic>
Crown Imperials do best in gardens with limy soil, so incorporating a few handfuls of limestone grit will make the soil more alkaline and improve drainage.
Roses are his specialty; they thrive in the limy clay called marl from which the house derives its name.
The big wall bulges out of the hillside, seeming from a distance to be a ruined medieval bastion, but close up it is clearly of modern construction, with the random limy sandstone given a grand order by the geometry of the cages.
A continuous transition from fine-grained, limy sandstone, to limy siltstone, to micritic limestones and limy marlstones with dolomitic content changing from horizon to horizon was observed.