limp

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Related to limpness: limpest

limp dishrag

1. A very weak willed, helpless, or cowardly person; one who lacks any real resolve, inner-strength, or motivation. My father was a sweet man, but he was a limp dishrag in all other aspects of life, bending to the will of everyone around him. I tried to raise you to be strong and independent, not some limp dishrag who just coasts through life without ambition. The new supervisor has been as effective at controlling his team as a limp dishrag.
2. One who is completely worn out or without energy. Between my hectic job and trying to mind the kids, I always feel like a limp dish rag by the time I get to bed at night. My dad used to work crazy long hours when we were kids, and he would just sit on the sofa like a limp dishrag on the weekends.
See also: dishrag, limp

limp in

1. Literally, to enter (some place) while walking lamely or irregularly, especially due to injury. I asked Tommy what had happened as he came limping in the door. The dog was missing for two days before it finally came limping in.
2. To move or travel in (to some place) with halting or unsteady progress, especially on or in a vehicle. The car was in such bad shape by the time we limped in to Las Vegas that I thought the engine would burst into flames right then and there.
3. In community poker, such as Texas hold 'em, to match the existing bet without raising before the community cards have been dealt. Limping in often makes you an easy target for stronger players.
See also: limp

limp off

To walk away from someone or something while putting more weight on one leg than the other, as due to an injury. Cassie limped off the field after twisting her ankle on that play. Only when Stu limped off did I realize that he must have forgotten his cane.
See also: limp, off

limp rag

1. A very weak willed, helpless, or cowardly person; one who lacks any real resolve, inner-strength, or motivation. My father was a sweet man, but he was a limp rag in all other aspects of life, bending to the will of everyone around him. I tried to raise you to be strong and independent, not some limp rag who just coasts through life without ambition. The new supervisor has been as effective at controlling his team as a limp rag.
2. One who is completely worn out or without energy. Between my hectic job and trying to mind the kids, I always feel like a limp dish rag by the time I get to bed at night. My dad used to work crazy long hours when we were kids, and he would just sit on the sofa like a limp rag on the weekends.
See also: limp, rag

limpdick

1. noun, vulgar slang A weak, cowardly, or ineffectual man. Don't be such a limpdick, Tom—just sign the contract already! I had a great opportunity to make our firm a lot of money, but our boss was too much of a limpdick to do what it took to make it happen.
2. adjective, vulgar slang Completely lacking in strength, resolve, and integrity. He talked a big talk during the election, but after taking office he's proved to be just another limpdick politician. My limpdick manager wouldn't deal with the abusive behavior from some of the staff.

limp-wristed

1. Weak; lacking force or conviction. Potentially offensive due to Definition 2. Many have criticized the president's limp-wristed response to the attack, calling for him to authorize a full-fledged military strike.
2. offensive Weak and effeminate; lacking qualities typically associated with masculinity. Used in a derogatory way to imply that a man is homosexual. He was at first dismissed out of hand by many as just a limp-wristed fop, but he proved himself to be one of the toughest litigators in the country.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

(limp) dishrag

n. a totally helpless person; a cowardly and spineless person. He’s sweet, but he’s a dishrag.
See also: dishrag, limp

limpdick

n. a weak or ineffective male. Stand up for yourself. Don’t be such a limpdick.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
From dryness and frizziness to damage control and limpness, there's a product on the shelves--or about to be--that addresses the problem.
Cataplexy can range from weakness in the knees to severe rag-doll limpness that can last for minutes.
has introduced its Revlon Hair Treatment line that includes nine products in three collections to treat dryness, damage and limpness, Each item is available at a suggested retail price of $9.99.
As limited as the options of the Sultan's Wife may be, Kabbani holds her responsible for her cowardice before the challenge of freedom: "The Arab woman / wants someone to chew the morsel of freedom for her / and to swallow it / That's why she is anemic, suffers / from a deficiency in iron and courage" ("Limpness," 5:123).
let us start with the head * yes of course the head ever full of fancies and the hair on the head * white * scraggly * thinning white early * never any temptation to dye it so no worry now about when and how to stop a subject of conversation * a source of folklore the legend of how my grandfather's hair turned white overnight when he was nineteen as he rode through the night out Longreach way to reach a brother dying of snakebite scraggly always never a hairdresser who understood its limpness and cowlicks apart from the Adelaide genius to whom I said * Make me look like Jane Fonda in Klute and she did what hairdresser now would've heard of Jane Fonda let alone Klute thinning now * so the pink scalp shows
He mocks Tibullus' coarse violence; but he exposes the limpness of the aesthete's alternative.
His greatest contempt is reserved for Harold Macmillan, the histrionic actor-manager through whose liquorice nature ran a `great streak of melancholic, rather whimpering defeatism'; but Anthony Eden, Duncan Sandys, Lord Home, Margaret Thatcher and Tony Benn receive a good drubbing as well, as does the trade union leader David Basnett (whose `vanity was exceeded only by his limpness'), J.F.
Manneristic intervention by the author-narrator, prefiguration, irony, some florid writing, but also some syntactic simplicity, are all seen to characterize her writing, but Powell does not fully convince me with his defence against accusations of limpness or flimsiness in her fiction.
Oh who is that young patient with the limpness of the wrists?
When Tate offered the first of several uncomfortable criticisms of the "limpness" of the poems, Jarrell responded that the effect was intentional: "it's an occupational risk, a defect of quality.
Movement traced a path from questioning to belief, resistance to yielding, from the fluid limpness of a martyred figure to the supplication of bowed heads and palm's raised in prayer.
Other reported symptoms on admission included limpness, lethargy, and grunting.
Poems and Antipoems, 1967) signaled a sharp turn in the direction of his work, away from what he called the "formalism and rhetoric, grandiloquence, posturing, preciosity, limpness of character, softness" of much Spanish poetry.