lime

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in the limelight

At the center of attention. The phrase refers to a type of lamp that was previously used in theatrical stage lighting. My sister loves being in the limelight, but I get really nervous on stage. Once news of this scandal breaks, our company will be in the limelight for months. He handles the financial side of the business, but he prefers not to be in the limelight when it comes to promotions and marketing.
See also: limelight

limejuicer

1. obsolete A British sailor, so called because of the Royal Navy's practice of adding lime juice to grog in order to combat scurvy. Primarily heard in US. A ship full of limejuicers just arrived into port where they met an icy reception from the locals.
2. dated By extension, any British person, especially an Englishman. The term is usually used in a derogatory manner. Primarily heard in US. We don't need some hoity-toity limejuicer coming in and telling us how to run our business. Why don't you go back to Britannia, you old limejuicer?
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

in the limelight

Also, in the spotlight. At the center of public attention or notoriety. For example, John loves being in the limelight, or The reporters made sure the attractive new actress would be in the spotlight. Both terms come from the theater and allude to focusing light on an important person, the first from a lighting device used from about 1840 on, the second from the early 1900s. Also see in the public eye; steal the show.
See also: limelight
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

limejuicer

and limey
n. a British sailor; and British citizen, typically a male. (The first one is old. Both are a little derogatory.) Some limey answered the telephone and I could hardly understand what she was saying.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

in the limelight

In the center of public attention. The term comes from a vivid lighting device used in theaters from about 1840 on to throw a strong light on the star of a performance. Relying on the combustion of oxygen and hydrogen on a surface of lime and a lens for directing the light, it was invented in 1826 by Thomas Drummond. George Bernard Shaw, in a letter concerning a controversy about censorship (ca. 1900), wrote, “Look after the limelight, and the play will look after itself.”
See also: limelight
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
If the liming recommendation called for 3 ton of calcitic limestone, based on the ECCE from Example 19-4, how much should be added?
The smaller the size of the liming material, the more reactive it is.
* practice calculations to determine the liming potential of various compounds.
Thus, liming treatments did not uniformly alter the soil's chemical properties, rather chemical changes were altered to a greater extent in the smaller aggregate classes.
Chemical analysis of the aggregate classes show that exchangeable Ca percentages (ECaP), the percentage ratio of Ca and the CEC, are distinctly different because of soil type, horizon designation and liming practices.
However, implementation of site-specific liming will depend on the farmer's perception of how the adoption of technology will increase their yields and profit, and lower their production risk.
A soil's lime requirement is influenced by its BC, the amount of exchangeable acidity in the soil solution, and the reason for liming. Soil pH and exchangeable A1 explained only moderate proportions of the variation in lime requirements.
Where added lime was accounted for (11 cases), simple regression of RLE with the amount of lime added explained 65% of the variation in the RLE (Eqn 2) in 1995 at a depth of 10-40 cm, but average rainfall or years since liming were not significant predictors.
Over all the sites in which mass balance for lime was estimated (15 sites, 22 cases; Table 2), 72% of the variation in the residual lime effect (y) within a depth of 10-40 cm was explained by the combined effects of the following variables: pH as measured in 1995 at the depth of lime incorporation ([pH.sub.1995]); years since liming; and Ca[CO.sub.3] added (t/ha).
Wet-sieving results indicated that, throughout the experiment, liming significantly changed the percentage by weight of only the [is greater than] 2 mm and (50 [micro]m aggregate fractions and not others.
At the end of the third year of lime application, increases in water stability of both cultivated soils due to liming were detected, as indicated by an increase in the [is greater than] 2 mm and a decrease in the (50 [micro]m aggregate size ranges (Fig.
Our results suggest that liming made subtle changes to the availability of soil P at Merredin; shoot P concentration and total P uptake at anthesis tended to be higher in the +lime than the -lime treatment (data not shown), although these differences were not significant (P> 0.1).
Tang C, Asseng S, Diatloff E, Rengel Z (2003) Modelling yield losses of aluminium-resistant and aluminium-sensitive wheat due to subsurface soil acidity: effects of rainfall, liming and nitrogen application.
Haynes, "Effects of liming on phosphate availability in acid soils," Plant and Soil, vol.
Fageria, "Response of rice cultivars to liming in certado soil," Pesquisa Agropecrnria Brasileira, Brasilia, vol.