limb


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Related to limb: phantom limb

be out on a limb

To have done or said something that lacks evidence or support. Her hypothesis is really out on a limb—the facts don't support it at all. That politician is out on a limb after publicly questioning the views of his party.
See also: limb, on, out

life and limb

One's bodily well-being, up to and including one's life. Usually used when describing something that might cause severe injury or death, especially in the phrase "risk life and limb." Today we pay our respects to the brave men and women who risk life and limb every day to keep our country safe. I'm sure it's thrilling, but I'd rather not chance life and limb just for a bit of an adrenaline rush.
See also: and, life, limb

risk life and limb

To do something that might cause severe injury or death. Today we pay our respects to the brave men and women who risk life and limb every day to keep our country safe. I'm sure it's thrilling, but I'd rather not risk life and limb just for a bit of an adrenaline rush.
See also: and, life, limb, risk

tear (one) limb from limb

To violently maim a person or animal. Typically used as a threat, rather than a description of an actual action. If I find out that you're the one who hurt my daughter, I will tear you limb from limb, understand?
See also: limb, tear

go out on a limb

To do or say something that lacks evidence or support. She really went out on a limb with that hypothesis—the facts don't support it at all. That politician went out on a limb and publicly questioned the views of his party. I don't think I'm going out on a limb by saying that everyone will like that idea.
See also: go, limb, on, out

(out) on a limb

In a position that lacks evidence, certainty, or support. The image is that of being situated on a branch of a tree, away from the support of the trunk. Her hypothesis is really out on a limb—the facts don't support it at all. That politician is out on a limb after publicly questioning the views of his party. I went on a limb getting my contacts at the company to give you a chance, so don't blow it.
See also: limb, on

*out on a limb

 
1. Lit. out on a limb of a tree where it is dangerous. (*Typically: be ~; go ~.) It's okay to climb the tree, but don't go out on a limb and fall off.
2. Fig. in a dangerous position to do something; at risk. (*Typically: be ~; go ~; put someone ~.) I don't want to go out on a limb, but I think we can afford to do it. If I had to go out on a limb, I would say that it will be a month before your merchandise will be delivered.
See also: limb, on, out

tear (someone or some animal) limb from limb

to rip someone or an animal to bits. The explosion tore the workers limb from limb. The crocodiles attacked the wading zebras and tore them limb from limb.
See also: limb, tear

out on a limb

In a difficult, awkward, or vulnerable position, as in I lodged a complaint about low salaries, but the people who had supported me left me out on a limb . This expression alludes to an animal climbing out on the limb of a tree and then being afraid or unable to retreat. [Late 1800s]
See also: limb, on, out

risk life and limb

Also, risk one's neck. Take dangerous chances, as in There he was on the roof, risking life and limb to rescue the kitten, or I don't want to risk my neck contradicting him. The first hyperbolic expression, dating from the early 1600s, doesn't make sense, since if one loses one's life one also loses the use of one's limbs. The variant, used for risky undertakings of all kinds, physical and nonphysical, presumably alludes to being hanged or beheaded. Also see stick one's neck out.
See also: and, life, limb, risk

risk life and limb

If you risk life and limb, you do something very dangerous that may cause you to die or be seriously injured. He is not prepared to risk life and limb on this dangerous track to win the title. She gets a thrill risking life and limb by leaping off cliffs and mountains.
See also: and, life, limb, risk

go out on a limb

COMMON If you go out on a limb, you do something or say something that is different from what most people do or say and is therefore risky. He does not want to go out on a limb and try something completely new. There's nothing wrong with politicians going out on a limb sometimes and risking their reputation.
See also: go, limb, on, out

out on a limb

or

on a limb

If you are out on a limb or are on a limb, you are alone and without any help or support. No company wants to be the first to put its rates up. The companies who have tried have found themselves out on a limb. She felt on a limb at the ministry. Note: In this expression, a limb is a branch of a tree. The image here is of someone who climbs out along a limb, away from the main trunk.
See also: limb, on, out

tear someone limb from limb

If someone threatens to tear you limb from limb, they say they will kill you in a very violent way. It was lucky for him the police found him before I did because I would have torn him limb from limb.
See also: limb, someone, tear

life and limb

life and all bodily faculties.
1993 Vanity Fair Castro is particularly irked by the bad press Cuba gets concerning…the rafters who risk life and limb to get to Florida.
See also: and, life, limb

out on a limb

1 isolated or stranded. 2 without support.
A limb here is the projecting branch of a tree. A related expression is go out on a limb , meaning ‘take a risk’ or ‘act boldly and uncompromisingly’.
1991 Times Education Supplement I don't always want to go out on a limb, or sound confrontational by flatly saying that the child has done this or that.
See also: limb, on, out

tear someone limb from limb

violently dismember someone.
See also: limb, someone, tear

out on a ˈlimb

(informal) in a risky or difficult position because you are saying or doing something which does not have the support of other people: When he started that company, he really went out on a limb. It might have been a disaster.I seem to be out on a limb here. Does nobody agree with my idea?
A limb in this phrase is a large branch of a tree.
See also: limb, on, out

risk ˌlife and ˈlimb

risk being killed or injured in order to do something: She risked life and limb to save her son from the fire.
See also: and, life, limb, risk

tear somebody ˌlimb from ˈlimb

(often humorous) attack somebody very violently: Julian looked so angry that I thought he was going to tear his brother limb from limb.
See also: limb, somebody, tear

(out) on a limb

Informal
In a difficult, awkward, or vulnerable position.
See also: limb, on

out on a limb

Stranded, exposed. The image of an animal crawling out on the branch of a tree and then afraid or unable to retreat was figuratively applied to other vulnerable conditions by the late nineteenth century. Marion Holbrook defined it further in Suitable for Framing (1941): “This is what they mean when they talk about being out on the end of a limb. Or painted into a corner.” See also twist in the wind.
See also: limb, on, out

risk life and limb, to

To take a serious chance; to jeopardize one’s life. This extravagant hyperbole for courting danger has been around since the seventeenth century, even though strictly speaking it makes little sense (life, after all, comprises one’s limbs as well). “The Turk meddles not with life and limb,” wrote James Howell in a letter (1623), and Thomas Burton’s diary entry of 1658 states, “They venture life and member.”
See also: and, life, risk
References in periodicals archive ?
Amputations were scheduled above the left knee and below right knee for bilateral lower limb gangrene after failure of bilateral femoral embolectomy.
With over 10,000 devices implanted and more than 30 peer-reviewed clinical studies published since its commercial release in 2011, Precice has proven to be a validated and preferred approach to addressing limb length discrepancies by surgeons and patients alike, said Massimo Calafiore, president of NuVasive Specialized Orthopedics.
"Watching a child suffering with any degree of upper limb spasticity is very difficult," said David Nicholson, Chief Research and Development Officer, Allergan.
Children who are born with or who develop differences in the length of their limbs can benefit from a range of treatments that may be as simple as the use of adaptive footwear or as sophisticated as limb lengthening surgical intervention that helps generate new bone in the affected limb.
Amputees still feel their missing limb, even if it is physically gone, and this ghost limb aka phantom limb is perceived as much smaller that the lost limb.
The artificial limb has been designed to be fixed directly to the bone.
Upper extremity disease was defined as disease confined to upper limb vessels with the same criteria of stenoses and occlusions as for lower limb vessels.
However, he would now undergo artificial limb procedure at the army rehabilitation institute.
As well known, for the human lower limb, hip joint has 3 DOFs, and the knee joint is a 1-DOF joint.
The artificial limbs, called Jaipur Foot, were designed in India but made by Filipino workers.
Pipeline Products for Critical Limb Ischemia - Overview 11
Critical limb ischemia is a condition, primarily in diabetics, that causes 250,000 amputations per year in the USA.
That is, when a branch hits the ground, it may spring off its limbs. Standing uphill of a limb's landing spot isn't necessarily a fool-proof idea.
The most visually distinguishable thing about an Excalibur crossbow is the recurve limbs. Free from mechanical hassle found with cams/wheels, a "hook the string to the limb tips" bow is simple in design and built to endure harsh conditions.
The decoupling identification of PMs, synthesis criteria of the limb decoupling, the selection criteria of the driving pairs, and the procedure of type synthesis for DPMs are established in Section 3.