lily

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paint the lily

To add embellishment to something that is already beautiful or outstanding. The phrase comes from Shakespeare's King John: "To gild refined gold, to paint the lily ... is wasteful and ridiculous excess." My wife is so gorgeous that putting her in a fancy gown would just be painting the lily. Why add a filter to your photo of the rainbow? No need to paint the lily.
See also: lily, paint

lily-white

1. Pure white in color. The locals were absolutely fascinated with our lily-white skin.
2. Strait-laced; totally honest. You're being naïve if you think the top business people are lily white.
3. Consisting solely or primarily of white people. He'd always lived in lily-white towns, so he felt a bit out of place when he moved to a city with a large black community.

lily-livered

Cowardly or fearful. I'm not surprised that Tom didn't come to the rally—he's too lily-livered to defend his beliefs in public.

gild the lily

To further adorn something that is already beautiful. You look radiant, as always—wearing such an extravagant gown is just gilding the lily.
See also: gild, lily

shake the dew off the lily

euphemism To urinate. Said of or by a man. Excuse me a moment, I just need to go shake the dew off the lily.
See also: dew, lily, off, shake

gild the lily

Fig. to add ornament or decoration to something that is pleasing in its original state; to attempt to improve something that is already fine the way it is. (Often refers to flattery or exaggeration.) Your house has lovely brickwork. Don't paint it. That would be gilding the lily. Oh, Sally. You're beautiful the way you are. You don't need makeup. You would be gilding the lily.
See also: gild, lily

gild the lily

Add unnecessary adornment or supposed improvement. For example, Offering three different desserts after that elaborate meal would be gilding the lily. This expression is a condensation of Shakespeare's metaphor in King John (4:2): "To gild refined gold, to paint the lily ... is wasteful and ridiculous excess." [c. 1800]
See also: gild, lily

gild the lily

If someone gilds the lily, they try to improve something which is already very good, and so what they are doing is unnecessary. There can be a temptation to gild the lily in such documents, making exaggerated claims about what the school can offer to students. Top the cake with ice cream or whipped cream, if you're keen on gilding the lily. Note: This expression may be based on lines in Shakespeare's `King John' (1595): `To gild refined gold, to paint the lily... Is wasteful and ridiculous excess.' (Act 4, Scene 2)
See also: gild, lily

gild the lily

try to improve what is already beautiful or excellent.
This phrase adapts lines from Shakespeare's King John: ‘To gild refined gold, to paint the lily…Is wasteful and ridiculous excess’.
See also: gild, lily

gild the ˈlily

try to improve something which is already perfect, and so spoil it: The dress is perfect. Don’t add anything to it at all. It would just be gilding the lily.This comes from Shakespeare’s play King John. Gild means ‘to cover something with a thin layer of gold’. A lily is a very beautiful flower.
See also: gild, lily

knock the dew off the lily

and shake the dew off the lily
phr. [for a male] to urinate, especially first thing in the morning. (The dew is urine.) He’s up and into the bathroom, knocking the dew off the lily long before I even get my eyes open. I gotta go shake the dew off the lily before I explode.
See also: dew, knock, lily, off

shake the dew off the lily

verb
See also: dew, lily, off, shake

lily-livered

mod. cowardly. That lily-livered guy is up hiding under his bed till this blows over.

gild the lily

1. To adorn unnecessarily something already beautiful.
2. To make superfluous additions to what is already complete.
See also: gild, lily

gild the lily, to

To add excessive ornament; to pile excess on excess. This term is a condensation of Shakespeare’s statement in King John (4.2), “To gild refined gold, to paint the lily . . . is wasteful and ridiculous excess.” Earlier (sixteenth-century) versions of this idea cited whitening ivory with ink (Erasmus, Adagia) and painting fine marble (George Pettie, Petite Pallace). Byron quoted Shakespeare correctly (“But Shakespeare also says, ’tis very silly to gild refined gold, or paint the lily”), in Don Juan (1818), but sometime during the succeeding years it became the cliché we now know.
See also: gild

gild the lily

Engage in an unnecessary and usually wasteful activity. Like carrying coals to Newcastle, to gild a lily would be a waste of time as the flower already possesses more than sufficient beauty. The phrase comes from a misquotation of lines from Shakespeare's King John: Therefore, to be possess'd with double pomp, To guard a title that was rich before, To gild refined gold, to paint the lily . . . Is wasteful and ridiculous excess.
See also: gild, lily
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the Beitou Farmers' Association, the calla lilies will bloom until the end of May.
Lilies are easy to grow as long as a couple of conditions are met.
Dave Leicester, Vets Now's head of clinical intelligence, said: "We see a 50% rise in pet emergency cases around this time of year and often it's due to cats and dogs eating things they shouldn't such as lilies and chocolate Easter eggs.
Once upon a time, apart from Lilium candidum, lilies were only seen in the gardens of the wealthy.
As their starting point, they have lilies from all over the world to help them come up with new colours, patterns, habits and perfumes.
Bulbils and stem bulblets are easy ways to propagate lilies, but only a few cultivated lilies form them.
This will be the first time five of Monet's water lilies have been brought together in the UK for more than a decade.
What Monet saw when he gazed on his water lilies, God must see when beholding creation.
I now successfully grow a few hundred or so lilies, mostly Asiatics and Martagons, along with some eye-catching locally hybridized crosses.
True lilies range in height from 30cm (12in) to 2.4m (8ft), come in every colour except blue, are often wonderfully fragrant and have blooms that vary in shape from spider to star and trumpet to what is called turkscap - the flower hangs down and the petals back up.
Water lilies should be available at florists this month, but you can use pink Gerbera daisies, chrysanthemums, or dahlias instead.
However, most of the 80 species of sea lilies found worldwide live on inaccessible, rocky slopes in the deep ocean, some as deep as 8,000 meters.
Curiously, lilies are often seen as exotic and expensive - and therefore difficult to grow - but many of the loveliest are hardy, free-flowering and more or less trouble-free.
O matter what size garden you have, there are flowers you should not be without - and lilies are high on that list.