liken (someone or something) to (someone or something else)

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liken (someone or something) to (someone or something else)

To represent or describe someone or something as being very similar to someone or something else. People keep likening him to Ronald Reagan for his particular political positions. I was really able to visualize it better after my teacher likened the chemical reaction to a football play.
See also: liken, something
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

liken someone or something to someone or something

to compare someone or something to someone or something, concentrating on the similarities. He is strange. I can only liken him to an eccentric millionaire. The poet likened James to a living statue of Mercury.
See also: liken
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in classic literature ?
Little Bethel might have been nearer, and might have been in a straighter road, though in that case the reverend gentleman who presided over its congregation would have lost his favourite allusion to the crooked ways by which it was approached, and which enabled him to liken it to Paradise itself, in contradistinction to the parish church and the broad thoroughfare leading thereunto.
I sometimes liken it to a fire of dry twigs and branches compared with one of solid coal, very bright and hot; but if it should burn itself out and leave nothing but ashes behind, what shall I do?
"I liken it to an outer-body experience now when I watch it on TV," he added.
Some liken it to a jet engine, but that's only if she's skipped breakfast too.
McGinley, one of Colin Montgomerie's four vice-captains in Wales, said: "You can liken it to scoring the winning goal in the World Cup Final.
Insiders liken it to Toyota's RAV4 and Ford's Edge, but state it will be a seven-passenger vehicle with a rear seat that folds flat into the rear floor.
His dismissal is deeply felt by those in his circle who liken it to a death in the family.
"You can liken it to side effects of a prescription drug--you don't know how it's going to interact with the over-the-counter drugs you're taking" Colborn says.