References in classic literature ?
SNAEFELL JOKUL--White occulting light withdrawn for winter.
There was light enough to see by, though not sufficient to distinguish things at a distance.
You or another, it is of very little consequence, provided I have a light.
Then addressing his companion nearest to him in a low voice: -- "Get a light, Menneville," said he, "and hold yourself ready for anything.
She looked at his face isolated in the little circle of light.
My eyes became accustomed to the light and to perceive objects in their right forms; I distinguished the insect from the herb, and by degrees, one herb from another.
A brilliant though waving flame was now plainly visible, gracefully gliding over the lake, and throwing its light on the water in such a manner as to tinge it slightly though in the air, so strong was the contrast, the darkness seemed to have the distinctness of material substances, as if the fire were imbedded in a setting of ebony.
In his flight he had forgotten the most valuable things he had, the blue light and the gold, and had only one ducat in his pocket.
The fascination of the light for the grey cub increased from day to day.
Its light illuminated a strip of thick tapestry, hanging loose from the ceiling to the floor, on the wall opposite to the door by which we had entered.
When he approaches the light his eyes will be dazzled, and he will not be able to see anything at all of what are now called realities.
As the welcome light diffused itself over the room, she turned from the table and looked towards the other side of the bed.
His stern face could not stay little Violet, and on through the long hall she went, heedless of the snow that gathered on her feet, and the bleak wind that blew around her; while the King with wondering eyes looked on the golden light that played upon the dark walls as she passed.
Two featherless beings appeared, uninvited, at the door of the summer-house, surveyed the constitutional creepers, and said, "These must come down"--looked around at the horrid light of noonday, and said, "That must come in"--went away, thereupon, and were heard, in the distance, agreeing together, "To-morrow it shall be done.
It was a July midnight; and from out A full-orbed moon, that, like thine own soul, soaring, Sought a precipitate pathway up through heaven, There fell a silvery-silken veil of light, With quietude, and sultriness, and slumber, Upon the upturned faces of a thousand Roses that grew in an enchanted garden, Where no wind dared to stir, unless on tiptoe -- Fell on the upturn'd faces of these roses That gave out, in return for the love-light, Their odorous souls in an ecstatic death -- Fell on the upturn'd faces of these roses That smiled and died in this parterre, enchanted By thee, and by the poetry of thy presence.