easy come, easy go

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easy come, easy go

When something is easily obtained, it is typically lost just as easily. Of course you found a $10 on the street and immediately spent it—easy come, easy go!
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Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

easy come, easy go

Cliché said to explain the loss of something that required only a small amount of effort to acquire in the first place. Ann found twenty dollars in the morning and spent it foolishly at noon. "Easy come, easy go," she said. John spends his money as fast as he can earn it. With John it's easy come, easy go.
See also: easy, go
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

easy come, easy go

Readily won and readily lost, as in Easy come, easy go-that's how it is for Mark when he plays the stock market. This phrase states a truth known since ancient times and expressed in numerous proverbs with slightly different wording ( lightly come, lightly go; quickly come, quickly go). The adverb easy was substituted in the early 1800s.
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The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

easy come, easy go

INFORMAL
You say easy come, easy go to mean that if money or objects are easy to get, you do not care very much about spending it or losing them. Note: In the first idiom below, ABC is pronounced `a b c', as if you are spelling it out. My attitude to money is easy come, easy go. That's to say, I earn a lot, but I also give quite a lot away in different ways.
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Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

easy come, easy go

used to indicate that something acquired without effort or difficulty may be lost or spent casually and without regret.
Although recorded in this exact form only from the mid 19th century, easy come, easy go had parallels in medieval French and in the English sayings light come, light go (mid 16th century) and quickly come, quickly go (mid 19th century).
See also: easy, go
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

ˌeasy ˈcome, ˌeasy ˈgo

(saying) something that has been obtained very easily and quickly may be lost or wasted in the same way: Her parents have given her all the money she wants, but she’s always in debt. With her, it’s a case of easy come, easy go.
See also: easy, go
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

easy come, easy go

What is readily achieved or gained is also readily lost. This principle was noted hundreds of years ago by the Chinese sage Chuang-tsze (“Quickly come and quickly go,” ca. 400 b.c.) and appears several times in Chaucer’s writings—for example, “As lightly as it comth, so wol we spende” (The Pardoner’s Tale). “Light come, light go” is also in John Heywood’s 1546 proverb collection. Easy was substituted for lightly and quickly in the nineteenth century.
See also: easy, go
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Ask any nurse, teacher or police officer you know whether they would lightly go on strike, and you will see how seriously broken the system was.
Once the paste is on the ceiling rose, lightly go over it with a brush to ensure there are no air pockets.
Another precaution at this point is for students to take a couple minutes (I usually sit on the other side of the students' desks and help them) and lightly go over only their drawing with a lighter Prismacolor[R] pencil, so that if they accidentally rub their arm across the board, they can still see their drawing.
"One doesn't lightly go down that road, but there was no alternative and I'm very happy with the unreserved apology today because that's what I sought from the very outset."
Using wire wool, lightly go over the floor once again to allow for a really clean and polished finish.
Explaining the decision, BHB spokesman Alan Delmonte said: "The Board doesn't lightly go against the advice of its expert panels, but the Race Planning Committee advise from a race-planning viewpoint.
The Prime Minister stressed, "We do not lightly go to fight.