lift from

lift from

1. To pick or raise someone or something up from some lower place or position. A noun or pronoun is used between "lift" and "from." He carefully lifted the antique from the table to examine it. The kidnappers lifted the child from her bed and carried her off into the night.
2. To relieve someone of some unpleasant emotion, pressure, burden, stress, etc. A noun or pronoun can be used between "lift" and "from." Nothing lifts the tension from my shoulders like classical music. All I wanted to do was lift some of the financial burden from you.
See also: lift

lift something from someone or something

to raise something off someone or something. Please lift this burden from me. I lifted the glass from the tray carefully.
See also: lift
References in periodicals archive ?
P1: 1 passenger lift from the vestibule (A) to changing rooms and reception rooms in the 1st lower floor technical;P2: 1 passenger lift from the vestibule (B) to the exhibition/ Alabaster hall; P3: 1 passenger lift from the vestibule (A) to the exhibition/ Alabaster hall;
P6: 1 passenger/freight lift from the 1st floor (stock receipt) to the 1st lower floor, 1st and 5th floors;
P7: 1 passenger lift from vestibule (B) to changing rooms and the stock receipt room in the 1st lower floor technical;
P8: 1 passenger/HC lift from the 1st floor to the 2nd floor;
P10: 1 passenger/HC lift from the main entrance facing Dr.
N1: 1 freight lift from the 1st lower floor to the 1st and 2nd floor;
N3: 1 freight lift from the 1st floor to the 1st lower floor;
The manipulator can lift from 7-7500 lb at an average of 250-400 lifts/hr, with some models reaching 700-800 lifts/hr.
The recommended weight limits for an occasional lift from floor level to a height of 91 cm are 39.5 kg for men and 20 kg for women (Military Standard 1472D, 1989).