lie to

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lay to

1. nauticalTo turn a ship into the wind so as to stop forward motion. We need to lay to with those nasty storm clouds on the horizon! After two days of laying to without a single whale sighting, the captain decided it was time to move on.
2. dated To set about some task or action promptly or enthusiastically. Lay to, everyone—we have to get this finished before the storm hits us! The hungry child laid to as soon as the food was placed before him.
3. To blame or credit someone or something for something. A noun or pronoun is used between "lay" and "to." He has always lain his success to the teachings of his former mentor. We can't just lay our current predicament on the last boss's failures.
See also: lay

lie to

1. To tell someone an untruth or falsehood. Don't lie to me—was it you who took the money? He's been lying to his employees for months about the state of the company.
2. Of a sailing vessel, to remain stationary while facing the wind. Make sure the ship lies to during the storm so as not to capsize.
See also: lie

lie to (one)

To tell one an untruth or falsehood. Don't lie to me—was it you who took the money? He's been lying to his employees for months about the state of the company.
See also: lie
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

lay something to something

to attribute something to something. I lay all our problems to the inadequacy of our training. Mary laid her success to a good upbringing.
See also: lay

lay to

to begin doing something, such as fighting or eating. All right, you guys. Lay to. The stuff will get cold if you don't eat it. Lay to! Let's get on with it.
See also: lay

lie to someone (about someone or something)

to tell an untruth about someone or something to someone. You wouldn't lie to me about Sarah, would you? I'm not lying to you!
See also: lie
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in classic literature ?
I wonder masel' who'd be bothered tellin' lies to them, even the newspapers, which is full of fool-talk."
Lying which comes through environment, like, [if] a child is scared of punishment and lies to protect himself [over and over] then it's a learned behaviour through conditioning."
they will hide behind their lies to let their voices appear from
In previous studies, significant correlations have been found among the telling of lies to parents and low self-esteem, severe depression, stress, and loneliness (Engels et al., 2006), but few researchers have analyzed the scope of undergraduates' day-to-day lying behavior and the relationships among that behavior, personality, and emotional adaptation (Engels et al., 2006; Jensen et al., 2004).
In some studies, the results have shown that boys were more tolerant than were girls regarding lying behavior and that they more often told lies to their parents than did girls (Jensen et al., 2004; Keltikangas-Jarvinen & Lindeman, 1997).
There is also the opportunity to assess the argument from analogy from personal to state-level lies to see if the typology relies too heavily upon it and to assess its validity.
Adolescents, in contrast, start to tell lies to protect their privacy.
Adolescents, in contrast, start to tell lies to protect their privacy For example, a 14-year-old arrives 10 minutes past curfew and says, "Sorry ...
"The more a leader lies to his people, the more he must lie to his people," Alterman writes.
Iago is a prime example of someone who lies to punish.
In the book, Feldman has debunked many myths and has said that we are not only bad at detecting falsehoods, but in fact are strongly and unconsciously willing to believe other people's lies to make our lives easier.
Frank's team videotaped 20 male college students telling lies to an experimenter described to them as an expert in lie detection.