lied

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lie (one's) way into (something or some place)

To obtain something or gain access to a particular place or thing through deceit. We tried to lie our way into the party, but we were immediately recognized as freshmen and told to leave. He didn't actually have any of the proper certifications—he just lied his way into the job.
See also: lie, way

lie about

1. To tell a falsehood or mistruth about (something). I know you spent the money, I just don't understand why you feel you need to lie about it to me. While a bit of embellishment is all right, never lie about your experience on a résumé.
2. To recline or loiter lazily; to loaf. You can't just lie about here all summer long. Either find a job and start paying rent, or find somewhere else to live. My friends and I always loved lying about at the lake near our neighborhood when we were kids.
3. To be placed or located in a haphazard or careless location or position. Usually used in the continuous tense. You can't leave such sensitive information lying about—someone could see it who's not meant to. Why are all these boxes lying about? Someone could trip over them!
See also: lie

lie at (one's) door

To be one's responsibility. Typically said of something negative. I'm the coach, and I called a bad play, so any blame for this loss lies at my door.
See also: door, lie

lie at the bottom of (something)

To be the fundamental cause of something. Stubbornness lies at the bottom of every unresolved disagreement.
See also: bottom, lie, of

lie behind (someone or something)

1. To be positioned behind someone or something. The gym lies behind the school.
2. To be in someone's or something's past. Don't be concerned about what lies behind you, only what lies ahead. Everything that lies behind us is what makes us who we are—the good and the bad.
3. To be the underlying cause of, reason for, or motivation behind something. I just don't know what lies behind his anger these days. Many believe it was the government's exorbitant taxes that lay behind the population's uprising.
See also: behind, lie

lie down on the job

To not work as hard as one should; to shirk one's responsibilities. If you lie down on the job again, you can be sure you'll be fired—there are plenty of guys who'd take your place in a minute.
See also: down, job, lie, on

lie like a rug

To lie brazenly and barefacedly. A pun on the dual meanings of "lie." My brother always lies like a rug to get out of trouble with our parents. I just can't understand how they still believe him at this stage. You know you have true power when you can lie like a rug, know that people don't believe you, and know that they'll go along with what you say regardless.
See also: lie, like, rug

lie like a tombstone

To lie brazenly and barefacedly. Possibly from the fact that tombstone epitaphs favor positive descriptions of the deceased over factual characterizations. My brother always lies like a tombstone to get out of trouble with our parents. I just can't understand how they still believe him at this stage. You know you have true power when you can lie like a tombstone, know that people don't believe you, and know that they'll go along with what you say regardless.
See also: lie, like

lie like a trooper

To lie often and barefacedly. My brother lies like a trooper to get out of trouble with our parents. I just can't understand how they still believe him at this stage. You know you have true power when you can lie like a trooper, know that people don't believe you, and know that they'll go along with what you say regardless.
See also: lie, like, trooper

lie to (one)

To tell one an untruth or falsehood. Don't lie to me—was it you who took the money? He's been lying to his employees for months about the state of the company.
See also: lie
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

lie about

 
1. [for someone] to recline lazily somewhere. She just lay about through her entire vacation. Don't lie about all the time. Get busy.
2. [for something] to be located somewhere casually and carelessly, perhaps for a long time. This hammer has been lying about for a week. Put it away! Why are all these dirty dishes lying about?
See also: lie

lie about someone or something (to someone)

to say something untrue about someone or something to someone. I wouldn't lie about my boss to anyone! I wouldn't lie about anything like that!
See also: lie

lie down on the job

 and lay down on the job
Fig. to do one's job poorly or not at all. (Lay is a common error for lie.) Tom was fired because he was laying down on the job. You mean he was lying down on the job, don't you?
See also: down, job, lie, on

lie like a rug

S/. to tell lies shamelessly. He says he didn't take the money, but he's lying like a rug. I don't believe her. She lies like a rug.
See also: lie, like, rug
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

lie like a trooper

tell lies constantly and flagrantly. Compare with swear like a trooper (at swear).
See also: lie, like, trooper
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

lie down on the ˈjob

(informal) not do a job properly: I’m not going to employ anybody here who lies down on the job. I only want people who work hard.
See also: down, job, lie, on
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

lie like a rug

in. to tell lies shamelessly. He says he didn’t take the money, but he’s lying like a rug.
See also: lie, like, rug
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

lie like a tombstone

To tell an untruth. Epitaphs written on headstones often exaggerate the deceased's relationships, accomplishments, and even personal data. The dearly departed may not in fact have been “beloved by his family” or “a brave soldier” or even born in the year in which he did indeed first see the light of day. Therefore, “here lies” can have a dual meaning.
See also: lie, like
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
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References in periodicals archive ?
Alan Walker contends that Liszt serves as a "missing link" between the lieder of Schumann and Mahler.
The subjects of Lieder are as varied as the literature of German Romanticism and cover every conceivable aspect of unrequited and unreachable love as well as marital contentment and friendship, loneliness, death, nature, war and religious faith.
One of the greatest of all Lieder is Schubert's second setting of a poem by Goethe, An den Mond (to the moon), which was composed in 1777 and published in 1789.
Even a brief comparison of his book with the recent collection German Lieder in the Nineteenth Century (ed.
Bist du (2d version) (S.277ii); Der Alpenjager (2d version) (S.292ii); Der Fischerknabe (2d version) (S.292ii); Der Gluckliche (S.334); Der Hirt (2d version) (S.292ii); Die drei Zigeuner (2d version) (S.320ii, original ending); Die Macht der Musik (1st version) (S.302i); Die Vatergruft (3d version) (S.281iii); Freudvoll und Leidvoll (1st setting, 2d version (S.280ii); Ich mochte hingehn (3d version) (S.296iii); Ich scheide (2d version) (S.319ii); Ihr Glocken von Marling (S.328); Im Rhein, im schonen Strome (2d version) (S.272ii); Jugendgluck (2d version) (S.323ii); Kling leise, mein Lied (2d version) (S.301 ii); Uber allen Gipfeln ist Ruh' (3d version) (S.306iii); Vergiftet sind meine Lieder (3d version) (S.289iii); Wer nie sein Brot mit Tranen a (1st setting, 2d version) (S.297ii)
Fehn and Hallmark find almost nine hundred pentameter lines in Schubert's lieder; their analysis underlines the composer's sensitivity for text declamation within the confines of a form.
The selection of poetry for his late lieder, written between 1822 and his death in 1828, reflects the influence of both Beethoven and Schubert's pending death from syphilis.
Finson begins with a review of the composer's essays on lieder. Surprisingly, given his dual importance as a lieder composer and music critic, Schumann was not a prolific writer on the subject; however, sufficient literature exists to glean the composer's opinions about the genre.
Jon Finson's Robert Schumann: The Book of Songs is a much needed overview of Schumann's lieder that replaces Eric Sams's outdated The Songs of Robert Schumann (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1969).
As Charles Rosen asserts (The Classical Style: Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven [New York: Viking Press, 1971, etc.], 454), after Schubert's "first tentative experiments, the principles on which most of his songs are written are almost entirely new; they are related to the Lieder of the past only by negation: they annihilate all that precedes." The view that "small to greater matters must give way" likewise has influenced Walther Durr, editor of the lieder volumes of the Neue Schubert-Ausgabe.
It is also surprising that he does not consider the lieder of Hugo Wolf.
Here Wagner recedes into the background, only to reappear centrally in the final chapter--a comparison of lieder by Mahler, Strauss, and Wolf--which concludes that Wagner's influence marks the lied in "the post-Wagnerian era."
Our understanding of Franz Schubert's lieder has been immeasurably enriched by the scholarship of Walther Durr whose editions of three of the four volumes here under review continue his practice of offering material that is of interest to performers and scholars alike.
The last decade has witnessed an outstanding array of publications on nineteenth-century lieder, with scholars such as Susan Youens, Richard Kramer, and Deborah Stein demonstrating that these works can be studied through a variety of historical and analytical approaches.
Frauen komponieren is an anthology of twenty-five lieder by ten German and Austrian women whose compositions span the late eighteenth through the early twentieth centuries.