lie about

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lie about

1. To tell a falsehood or mistruth about (something). I know you spent the money, I just don't understand why you feel you need to lie about it to me. While a bit of embellishment is all right, never lie about your experience on a résumé.
2. To recline or loiter lazily; to loaf. You can't just lie about here all summer long. Either find a job and start paying rent, or find somewhere else to live. My friends and I always loved lying about at the lake near our neighborhood when we were kids.
3. To be placed or located in a haphazard or careless location or position. Usually used in the continuous tense. You can't leave such sensitive information lying about—someone could see it who's not meant to. Why are all these boxes lying about? Someone could trip over them!
See also: lie
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

lie about someone or something (to someone)

to say something untrue about someone or something to someone. I wouldn't lie about my boss to anyone! I wouldn't lie about anything like that!
See also: lie

lie about

 
1. [for someone] to recline lazily somewhere. She just lay about through her entire vacation. Don't lie about all the time. Get busy.
2. [for something] to be located somewhere casually and carelessly, perhaps for a long time. This hammer has been lying about for a week. Put it away! Why are all these dirty dishes lying about?
See also: lie
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
See also:
References in classic literature ?
Poor boy, I reckon he's lied about it -- but it's a blessed, blessed lie, there's such a comfort come from it.
They discuss how clients are typically deceptive in therapy, the difficulties therapists have in detecting secrets and lies, and why patient deception matters; efforts from social science and philosophical traditions to define and categorize the lies, secrets, and deceptions used by humans; the clinical and empirical literature on reasons why clients lie, how client deception can be categorized, and the topics that tend to be concealed, minimized, or lied about; and the factors that impact clients' tendency to disclose vs.
Roosevelt, who lied about a naval incident in 1941 to help draw the United States into World War II, and Lyndon B.
4) Many politicians have run into serious legal and ethical problems because they lied about their age and educational qualifications.
Rogers needed money to support the lifestyle he claimed to have earned, so he lied about the cost (and resale value) of assets he was financing.
About 60 percent of the school-aged children who had not been lied to by the experimenter peeked at the tricky temptation toy -- and about 60 percent of the peekers lied about it later.
Statistically, their scores were so implausible that they are likely to have lied about the numbers they rolled, rather enjoying a series of lucky rolls.
He also lied about the reasons for our war in the Philippines, claiming we only wanted to "civilize" the Filipinos, while the real reason was to own a valuable piece of real estate in the far Pacific, even if we had to kill hundreds of thousands of Filipinos to accomplish that.
Of the 307 HR managers who verify dates of employment, 55 percent reported that applicants sometimes lied about how long they held their jobs.
In the immediate aftermath of the Iraq war, Alterman notes, some of America's most influential voices on foreign affairs, like Thomas Friedman of The New York Times and the editorial page of The Washington Post, aided Bush by brushing off evidence that the president had lied about weapons of mass destruction.
From the beginning of his career, he has lied about virtually everything.
Let him know that while a broken object may need to be replaced or repaired and you maybe upset, you would be even more upset if he lied about it.
A fifth lied about where their New Year's Eve celebrations were held, pretending they were at swanky parties when they were in fact at home watching TV.
In their eyes, in a contrast Quinn does not make, Reagan did not bring Washington into disrepute when he lied about Iran-contra, nor did Bush when, on Christmas Eve, 1992, he pardoned six high administration officials, four of whom had already been convicted of perjury and withholding information from Congress.
Eisenhower lied about our spy flights over the Soviet Union, even after one flier on such a mission was shot down.