lie doggo

lie doggo

Fig. to remain unrecognized (for a long time). This problem has lain doggo since 1967. If you don't find the typos now, they will lie doggo until the next edition.
See also: doggo, lie

lie doggo

remain motionless or quiet. British
Lie doggo is of uncertain origin, but probably arose from a dog's habit of lying motionless or apparently asleep but nonetheless alert.
See also: doggo, lie

lie ˈdoggo

(old-fashioned, informal) be very still or hide somewhere so that you will not be found: I lay doggo in the yard while the police searched the house for me.
See also: doggo, lie

lie doggo

(ˈlɑɪ ˈdɔgo)
in. to remain unrecognized (for a long time). (see also doggo. Old, but Standard English.) If you don’t find the typos now, they will lie doggo until the next edition.
See also: doggo, lie
References in periodicals archive ?
But, much to the disappointment of his alleged attackers, Johnny Adair refuses to lie doggo.
Six feet down, water temperature was recorded at 72 degrees, and in conditions like that, trout only want to do one thing - lie doggo on the bottom on the lake.
You could sing like Chaliapin you could fight like Alexander Nevsky but you might as well lie doggo and just pray for snow like Sergei Mikhailovich in Alma Alta.
But within hours, the Conservatives were up to their neck again in sleaze, that troublesome beast which the Government had hoped would lie doggo at least during the campaign.
They may lie doggo for years but inevitably, they resurface to plague and confuse mankind.
Unlike mad dogs and Englishmen lying out in the midday sun, they lie doggo in the deeper pools or depths of the loch.
The circumstantial evidence against me is strong, in that V will say it was all my doing and I will lie doggo for a while, but I am only concerned about the children.