lick at (something)

(redirected from licks at)

lick at (something)

1. To lick something intensely and repeatedly. The dog just kept licking at my fingers No matter how much I lick at this suction cup, I can't get it to stick on the window.
2. Of flame, to touch or pass over something very rapidly. The flames were licking at our heels as we climbed the ladder. The fire had just begun licking at the trees when the rain began and quenched the flame.
See also: lick
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

lick at something

to draw the tongue over something repeatedly. Jimmy was just licking at the ice-cream cone, and soon it began to melt and drip off his elbow. I don't just lick at the ice cream. I take big bites of it.
See also: lick
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Sometime during the month of February, I make mineral licks at the edge of the thickest cover I can find on the properties I plan to hunt.
The spatial distribution of mineral licks at the study area is described in Link et al.
Tapir and paca visited mineral licks at the TBS site frequently throughout our study period, suggesting that licks provide key resources for them as well (Montenegro, 2004).
Sometime during the month of February I will make mineral licks at the edge of the thickest cover I can find on all the properties I plan to hunt.
But next month the actress, who once dated film hunk Brad Pitt, will unleash tracks from her debut album You're Speaking My Language on Birmingham, when she performs with band Juliette and The Licks at the Carling Academy.
The 2 licks at the control site were considered as one due to their proximity and interconnected moose trails.
Licks at the spout resulted in a circuit closure, the other end connected to all 20 parallel stainless steel bars of the grid floor.