libber


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libber

A female activist who advocates strongly for the rights, liberty, and equality of women. Shortened from "women's libber," itself a shortening of "women's liberation (movement)" with the suffix "-er" to indicate agency. Sometimes used as an insulting or derogatory term. I wouldn't necessarily consider myself a libber, but I am definitely in support of feminism. That just sounds like something a man-hating libber would say.

libber

(ˈlɪbɚ)
n. a woman who advocates woman’s liberation movements; a feminist. (Usually derogatory.) She sure sounds like a libber.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, CARE 1 did purchase radio time for two ads: One featured blue-collar worker who said that he was "no women's libber" but that he was tired of having people tell him what to do; in the second ad, a woman reminded listeners that "someone you know has dealt with this issue." Celebrate Life, on the other hand, purchased no radio time, either.
She began by saying, "I am not a women's libber, but ...
That was your fantasy, to sit like swells: Primped, feminine, your thoughts all bagatelles And me the waiter's tyrant, me John Wayne, Me Tarzan, you - a Woman's Libber - Jane.
Yet women who compete like men are considered "unfeminine," or are labelled the "women's libber" or the "Iron Maiden." (By the same token, men who display the traditional sensitivity of females are considered "wimps.") And working mothers or women committed to family are labelled as "lacking commitment."
Although feminist politics in the academy is continuing to expand in Germany and some women academics are forging a more feminist conception of their role, many academic women in Germany are still confronted with the unappetizing choice between professional identity and respect as an "honorary male" or solidarity with women and consequent stigmatization as a "women's libber" ("Emanze").
"We aim to balance the |freakish women's libber' coverage (presented by media coverage.)" (News Sheet).
A whole generation of women workers inevitably expresses feminism with the disclaimer "I'm not a women's libber, but...." Recent clerical organizing campaigns (especially the "9 to 5" movement, which has encouraged office workers to "think union" through gradual stages of militancy), as well as the continued work of the Coalition of Labor Union Women, which has been most effective within organized labor, have helped women make inroads, especially in terms of bargaining priorities and leadership opportunities.
Keira Knightley is a women's libber who invaded the stage with 50 others when the Albert Hall hosted Miss World in 1970.
I'd been a radical, feminist women's libber, having come from an upper middle-class background, and he came from a working-class background, and we both shared a real sense of justice.
For any women's libber wondering why she wasn't there, the Mother, of the Mother and Child statue outside Boots, couldn't get a baby sitter.
While Tripp was no gay libber in the movement sense--he never publicly came out--he belonged to the gay tribe and looked at evidence through a lens that he undoubtedly acquired from leading a gay life.
She imagined Andy, weird John, and Frank sitting around their smoky living room with the patterned mirror walls, listening to Frank's erudite, nasal-voiced admirers arguing politics or the merits of post-minimalism while rolling Frank's joints for him--always talking the libber talk but walking the groupie walk.
However, I am not a 'women's libber.'" (29) Walker Knight wrote in response to Home Missions magazine's investigation of the issue of women's changing role within Southern Baptist churches, "We discovered no militant feminists among Southern Baptist church-women, but we did discover a strong undercurrent of discontent." (30) Lawrence Webb, in an issue of Royal Service, referred to these "militant feminists" as "Radic-libbers." (31) By referring to radical feminists as women's libbers, militant feminists, and radic-libbers, Southern Baptist writers created a rhetorical space in which they could, by contrast, position themselves as moderates, advocating for women's equality without disrupting the existing social order.
One women's libber, Camille Paglia, said her problem wasn't men, but food.