let (someone or something) go

(redirected from letting someone go)

let (someone or something) go

1. To make free or give up control of something or someone; to release or discharge something or someone, as from confinement. Due to a lack of evidence, police had to let the suspects go. I love fishing but hate killing animals, so I let whatever I catch go.
2. To end a professional relationship with someone; to fire someone. A: "Wait, they fired you?" B: "Yes! They just let me go with no explanation!"
See also: go, let

let go

1. To stop physically holding on to someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "let" and "go." If you let go of the ledge, you'll fall! The baby refused to let go of the rattle. He let the rock go, and it was a long time before we heard it hit the bottom.
2. To fire or dismiss an employee. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "let" and "go." I'm worried that they'll let me go once this special project is over. I heard they're going to let go a lot of employees involved in the scandal.
3. To release someone or something from custody. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "let" and "go." We did bring him in for questioning, but we had nothing to charge him with, so we had to let him go. What time did you let go the prisoner?
4. To stop pursuing a particular desire or attempting to maintain a particular situation and accept things as they are. In this usage, the phrase is often "let it go." He's never going to clean the kitchen as diligently as you would—just let it go. It's been 10 years, Ken. I think it's time for you to let go and move on.
5. To relax and not focus on one's responsibilities or stresses. I think I just need a weekend where I can let go for a while and not worry about what's going on at work.
6. To utter some sudden, fierce, or uncontrolled noise. Often followed by "with something." The trapped wolf let go with a bone-chilling howl. I don't know what made him so angry, but he suddenly let go a string of expletives.
See also: go, let
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

let someone go

Euph. to fire someone. They let Jane go from her job. Fm afraid we're going to have to let you go.
See also: go, let

let go

 (with something) and cut loose (with something); let loose (with something)
1. to shout something out or expel something; to shout or express something wildly. The whole team let go with a loud shout. The audience cut loose with a loud cheer.
2. to deliver a strong verbal reprimand. Molly let loose with a tremendous scolding at Dave. Dave cut loose with a vengeful retort.
See also: go, let
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

let go

1. Allow to escape, set free, as in The police decided to let him go. [c. 1300]
2. Also, let go of. Release one's hold on, as in Please let go of my sleeve, or Once he starts on this subject, he never lets go. [Early 1400s]
3. let it go. Allow it to stand or be accepted. For example, Let it go; we needn't discuss it further. This usage is sometimes amplified to let it go at that, meaning "allow matters to stand as they are." [Late 1800s]
4. Cease to employ, dismiss, as in They had to let 20 workers go.
5. Also, let oneself go. Behave without restraint, abandon one's inhibitions; also, neglect one's personal hygiene and appearance. For example, When the music began, Jean let herself go and started a wild dance, or After her husband's death she let herself go, forgetting to bathe and staying in her nightgown all day . The first sense dates from the late 1800s, the second from the early 1900s.
See also: go, let
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ˌlet somebody ˈgo


1 allow somebody to be free: Will they let the hostages go?
2 make somebody have to leave their job: They’re having to let 100 employees go because of falling profits.
See also: go, let, somebody

ˌlet somebody/something ˈgo

,

ˌlet ˈgo (of somebody/something)


1 stop holding somebody/something: Let go of me! You’re hurting!Don’t let go of my hand, or you’ll get lost.
2 give up an idea or an attitude, or control of something: It’s time to let the past go.Some people find it hard to let go of their inhibitions.
See also: go, let, somebody, something
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

let go

To cease to employ; dismiss: had to let 20 workers go.
See also: go, let
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Letting someone go is never easy, but one bad hire can quickly spread and be detrimental to an organization's culture and success.
Letting someone go is painful and it takes time to get it over it but you know it's the right thing to do.
Solution: Letting someone go is stressful for both parties.
"I don't want John to go into the game thinking he can't get a yellow card and letting someone go past him," said Poyet.
No matter how justified the termination is, letting someone go is an emotional challenge for the manager who has to do it.
Bad decisions about employees can irreparably affect morale in the office--whether it is because you are keeping someone on board who shouldn't be there or letting someone go when it's not obvious to the rest of the staff as to why.
"Employers really have to be careful about their internal communications when they're considering what the criteria are for letting someone go," says Keith Watts, a shareholder at Olgetree Deakins.
"Cooking dinner for your family's a gift, and so is letting someone go in front of you in traffic.
Kent could bring in an assistant coach who's considered a strong X's and O's guy, even though the move would mean letting someone go.
I don't believe there is a transfer list nowadays other than making it public knowledge you are considering letting someone go."
"There's no point letting someone go to Beijing with 2.25mwhen everyone else has jumped 2.30mbecause they won't even make the final.
It's always good to keep some sort of professional distance with employees, because when something happens, and things always happen, you don't want to feel guilty about letting someone go if they're slacking off.
Good field employees are so hard to come by that letting someone go can be agonizing.
Letting someone go, cutting a hopelessly unproductive or outdated segment of a firm can be devastating.
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