let off

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let off

1. To allow someone to disembark from a mode of transportation. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "let" and "off." Hey, let me off! This is my stop! I'll be back to the station after I let off the rest of the passengers at the next stop.
2. To pardon, release, or allow someone to escape from blame, responsibility, obligation, or difficulty. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "let" and "off." At first, Sam was suspected of stealing money from the safe, but he was let off after security camera footage showed it was someone else. I was meant to spend the weekend cleaning out the garage, but my wife let me off so I could go on the big fishing trip with my buddies.
3. To release or emit something. I called the repair guy because the furnace suddenly stopped letting off heat last night. We dove for cover when we heard someone suddenly start letting off shots.
See also: let, off
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

let someone (get) off (something)

to permit someone to disembark, dismount, or leave something. Please move and let me get off the bus. Let her off!
See also: let, off

let someone off (easy)

 and let someone off
to release or dismiss someone without punishment. The judge didn't let me off easy. The judge let off Mary with a warning.
See also: let, off

let something off

to release something; to give something off. The engine let some evil smelling smoke off. The flower let off a wonderful smell.
See also: let, off
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

let off

1. Release by exploding; see blow off steam.
2. Allow to go free or escape; excuse from punishment. For example, They let her off from attending graduation, or The headmaster let him off with a reprimand. [Early 1800s] Also see off the hook.
See also: let, off
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

let off

v.
1. To allow someone to disembark from a vehicle: My house is just down the street, but you can let me off at the corner. The bus driver let off the passengers at the terminal.
2. To excuse or pardon someone from something unpleasant, as punishment or work: I'm going to let you off this once, but if I catch you cheating again, you're going to be expelled. The police arrested the leader and let off the rest of the gang with only a warning.
3. To emit something, as heat, gas, or sound: The stove lets off a lot of heat.
4. To detonate or discharge something: The police officer let off a warning shot. We let a firecracker off in the park.
See also: let, off
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Phil Wilson, customer operations manager of Central Networks, said: "Building a bonfire or letting off fireworks near to overhead power lines could not only cause a power cut to yourself, your friends and your neighbours, it could also pose a safety danger to those around you.
The ban on letting off fireworks between 11pm and 7 am is part of a clamp down on anti-social behaviour.
My immediate reaction was to wonder at what point letting off fireworks becomes a breach of the peace.
Then head for www.grumbletext.co.uk where you will meet a lot of like-minded souls letting off steam about the treatment they have received from some of our top companies.
They spend their whole time talking about sex, sex and sex - unless they're letting off wind.
It would include a ban on letting off fireworks bet-ween 11pm and 7am all year round, except New Year's Eve, and a total ban on the sale of powerful fireworks to the public.
Anyway, who are the people who start letting off rockets and loud explosives as soon as we get to the middle of October every year?
It would include a ban on letting off fireworks between 11pm and 7am, except on New Year's Eve, and a total ban on the sale of powerful fireworks to the public.