let (someone or something) go

(redirected from letting him go)

let (someone or something) go

1. To make free or give up control of something or someone; to release or discharge something or someone, as from confinement. Due to a lack of evidence, police had to let the suspects go. I love fishing but hate killing animals, so I let whatever I catch go.
2. To end a professional relationship with someone; to fire someone. A: "Wait, they fired you?" B: "Yes! They just let me go with no explanation!"
See also: go, let

let go

1. To stop physically holding on to someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "let" and "go." If you let go of the ledge, you'll fall! The baby refused to let go of the rattle. He let the rock go, and it was a long time before we heard it hit the bottom.
2. To fire or dismiss an employee. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "let" and "go." I'm worried that they'll let me go once this special project is over. I heard they're going to let go a lot of employees involved in the scandal.
3. To release someone or something from custody. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "let" and "go." We did bring him in for questioning, but we had nothing to charge him with, so we had to let him go. What time did you let go the prisoner?
4. To stop pursuing a particular desire or attempting to maintain a particular situation and accept things as they are. In this usage, the phrase is often "let it go." He's never going to clean the kitchen as diligently as you would—just let it go. It's been 10 years, Ken. I think it's time for you to let go and move on.
5. To relax and not focus on one's responsibilities or stresses. I think I just need a weekend where I can let go for a while and not worry about what's going on at work.
6. To utter some sudden, fierce, or uncontrolled noise. Often followed by "with something." The trapped wolf let go with a bone-chilling howl. I don't know what made him so angry, but he suddenly let go a string of expletives.
See also: go, let
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

let someone go

Euph. to fire someone. They let Jane go from her job. Fm afraid we're going to have to let you go.
See also: go, let

let go

 (with something) and cut loose (with something); let loose (with something)
1. to shout something out or expel something; to shout or express something wildly. The whole team let go with a loud shout. The audience cut loose with a loud cheer.
2. to deliver a strong verbal reprimand. Molly let loose with a tremendous scolding at Dave. Dave cut loose with a vengeful retort.
See also: go, let
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

let go

1. Allow to escape, set free, as in The police decided to let him go. [c. 1300]
2. Also, let go of. Release one's hold on, as in Please let go of my sleeve, or Once he starts on this subject, he never lets go. [Early 1400s]
3. let it go. Allow it to stand or be accepted. For example, Let it go; we needn't discuss it further. This usage is sometimes amplified to let it go at that, meaning "allow matters to stand as they are." [Late 1800s]
4. Cease to employ, dismiss, as in They had to let 20 workers go.
5. Also, let oneself go. Behave without restraint, abandon one's inhibitions; also, neglect one's personal hygiene and appearance. For example, When the music began, Jean let herself go and started a wild dance, or After her husband's death she let herself go, forgetting to bathe and staying in her nightgown all day . The first sense dates from the late 1800s, the second from the early 1900s.
See also: go, let
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ˌlet somebody ˈgo


1 allow somebody to be free: Will they let the hostages go?
2 make somebody have to leave their job: They’re having to let 100 employees go because of falling profits.
See also: go, let, somebody

ˌlet somebody/something ˈgo

,

ˌlet ˈgo (of somebody/something)


1 stop holding somebody/something: Let go of me! You’re hurting!Don’t let go of my hand, or you’ll get lost.
2 give up an idea or an attitude, or control of something: It’s time to let the past go.Some people find it hard to let go of their inhibitions.
See also: go, let, somebody, something
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

let go

To cease to employ; dismiss: had to let 20 workers go.
See also: go, let
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
Addressing lawyers here, he said that Pervez Musharraf was allowed to go abroad for treatment under a deal, adding that he should be tried in the court of law instead letting him go abroad.
"Generally, throughout last season and the summer, there have been a few League One and League Two clubs who have enquired about Liam but it's not something where we're close to letting him go.
Dunfermline new boy Alex Whittle is determined to show boyhood heroes Liverpool they made a big mistake letting him go.
In the police car, he allegedly offered them again a sum for letting him go.
Eagles coach Andy Reid said Westbrook, 30, was one of the "all-time great Philadelphia Eagles" but the Eagles coach would not give specific details as to why they were letting him go.
It would be difficult to see Rangers letting him go as Walter Smith will be looking to go to the Champions League by winning the SPL.
Their parents always regretted letting him go but always kept in touch with Fairbridge Farm School at Molong, Australia.
Whelan is ready to cash in on any January bid for the England front-man rather than letting him go for nothing when his contract runs out at the end of the season.
Afterwards Gradi said: 'I made a mistake letting him go. Perhaps I only made two.
Coventry are thinking of letting him go out on loan as they feel it would benefit him.
I just hope that Bolton's notoriously advanced training systems don't make us rue letting him go in the long run and I hope that we exhausted EVERY avenue of getting him fit.
"In fact, Tam should be thanking us for letting him go. The emergence of Alan Lowing and Stevie Smith shows Murray Park is a success.
CLAUDIO RANIERI last night hailed Juan Sebastian Veron as "pure gold" and promised the Argentina midfielder will prove to Manchester United they made a massive blunder by letting him go.
OLD boy Andy Payton shot down Huddersfield and then blasted the Terriers for letting him go.
"But his confidence is at an all-time low and when he asked if I would consider letting him go on a free, I decided it would be best for him.