let bygones be bygones

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let bygones be bygones

To stop focusing on something that happened in the past (usually a source of conflict or tension). I said I was sorry—can't we let bygones be bygones?
See also: bygone, let

Let bygones be bygones.

Cliché Forgive someone for something he or she did in the past. Jill: Why don't you want to invite Ellen to your party? Jane: She was rude to me at the off ice picnic. Jill: But that was six months ago. Let bygones be bygones. Nancy held a grudge against her teacher for a long time, but she finally decided to let bygones be bygones.
See also: bygone, let

let bygones be bygones

What's done is done; don't worry about the past, especially past errors or grievances. For example, Bill and Tom shook hands and agreed to let bygones be bygones. [First half of 1600s]
See also: bygone, let

let bygones be bygones

If people let bygones be bygones, they agree to forget about arguments and problems that have happened in the past so that they can improve their relationship. She met him again by chance through friends and decided to let bygones be bygones for the sake of her art.
See also: bygone, let

let bygones be bygones

forgive and forget past offences or causes of conflict.
See also: bygone, let

let ˌbygones be ˈbygones

decide to forget about disagreements that happened in the past: This is a ridiculous situation, avoiding each other like this. Why can’t we let bygones be bygones?
See also: bygone, let

let bygones be bygones

Don’t worry about the past; forgive and forget. Although the idea dates from ancient times, the wording comes from the seventeenth century, when it was cited by several writers as a proverb or parable. It continued to be widely quoted (by Scott, Tennyson, and Shaw, among others). The word bygone, meaning “past,” dates from the fourteenth century and survives principally in the cliché.
See also: bygone, let
References in periodicals archive ?
Why don't you walk away from me, and then come back and say hi." I walked five feet away, then paced back and said "Hi, my name's Patrick, nice to meet you." Letting bygones be bygones, Reda and I have become friends.
Far from letting bygones be bygones, Smuin was quite public in letting it be known that he thought the new regime was, in his words, "boring." In 1988, after Smuin danced his way onstage to accept the Tony Award for Cole Porter's Anything Goes on Broadway, his first words on national television were, "This is such sweet revenge."
The lovely Anna Windass is all for letting bygones be bygones and decides to invite her neighbours for a drink in the Rovers.