let sleeping dogs lie

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let sleeping dogs lie

To leave a situation alone so as to avoid worsening it. Oh, don't mention that fight they had months ago—let sleeping dogs lie!
See also: dog, let, lie, sleep
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Let sleeping dogs lie.

Prov. Do not instigate trouble.; Leave something alone if it might cause trouble. Jill: Should I ask the boss if he's upset at my coming in late in the mornings? Jane: If he hasn't said anything about it, just let sleeping dogs lie. I thought I would ask Jill if she wanted me to pay her back right away, but then I decided to let sleeping dogs lie.
See also: dog, let, lie, sleep
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

let sleeping dogs lie

Allow inactive problems to remain so, as in Jane knew she should report the accident but decided to let sleeping dogs lie. This injunction to avoid stirring up trouble was already a proverb in the 13th century. It alludes to waking up a fierce watchdog and has been stated in English since the late 1300s.
See also: dog, let, lie, sleep
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

let sleeping dogs lie

If you tell someone to let sleeping dogs lie, you are warning them not to interfere in a situation or not to talk about problems that have happened in the past. Why does she come over here stirring everything up? Why can't she let sleeping dogs lie? Note: You can call a situation that it would be better not to disturb a sleeping dog. The crux of the film is that his inquisitive son, by arousing the sleeping dog of the past, finds himself in danger.
See also: dog, let, lie, sleep
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

let sleeping dogs lie

avoid interfering in a situation that is currently causing no problems, but may well do so as a consequence of such interference. proverb
In the early 14th century the French phrase n'esveillez pas lou chien qui dort advised ‘do not wake the sleeping dog’, while Chaucer remarks in Troilus and Criseyde ‘it is nought good a slepyng hound to wake’. The present form of the proverb seems to be traceable to Walter Scott's novel Redgauntlet ( 1824 ).
See also: dog, let, lie, sleep
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

let ˌsleeping dogs ˈlie

(saying) do not disturb a situation which could cause trouble: I was very careful about what I said. It’s best to let sleeping dogs lie, I think.
See also: dog, let, lie, sleep
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

let sleeping dogs lie

Don’t stir up trouble; leave well enough alone. Rabelais quoted this thirteenth-century proverb, as did Chaucer in Troilus and Criseyde, both alluding to rousing a potentially fierce watchdog.
See also: dog, let, lie, sleep
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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