let up

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let up

1. To allow someone to get up off the ground. A noun or pronoun can be used between "let" and "up." Stop wrestling your brother and let him up, Timmy. Don't let up the suspect until you've put handcuffs on him.
2. To allow someone to come up to some higher position or level. A noun or pronoun can be used between "let" and "up." My sister wouldn't let me up into the tree house. I told the receptionist not to let up anyone he didn't recognize.
3. To cease or become less intense. Usually used in reference to weather. I'm hoping the rain lets up soon. The snow hasn't let up for nearly a week.
4. To apply less force to something. Often followed by "on." Let up on the accelerator a little, or you'll burn out the engine. The line is too taut, so let up a little.
5. To put less pressure on or be more lenient with someone. Often followed by "on." They are not going to let up on us in the second half, so we better be ready to battle with them. I know we've been hard on Erin, but I feel like she'll go back to her old ways if we let up now.
See also: let, up

let up (on someone or something)

To become more lenient or less forceful with someone or when doing something. They are not going to let up on us in the second half, so we better be ready to battle with them. I know we've been hard on Erin, but I feel like she'll go back to her old ways if we let up now. Let up on the accelerator a little, you're going to burn out the engine.
See also: let, someone, up
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

let up (on someone or something)

Fig. to reduce the pressure or demands on someone or something. You had better let up on Tom. He can't handle any more work. Please let up on the committee. It can only do so much. Do let up. You are getting too upset.
See also: let, up

let up

 
1. to diminish. I hope this rain lets up a little soon. When the snow lets up so I can see, I will drive to the store.
2. to stop [doing something] altogether. The rain let up about noon, and the sun came out.
See also: let, up
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

let up

1. See let down, def. 2.
2. Cease, stop entirely, as in The rain has let up so we can go out. [Late 1700s]
3. let up on. Be or become more lenient with, take the pressure off, as in Why don't you let up on the child? [Late 1800s]
See also: let, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

let up

v.
1. To allow something or someone to go or get up: Stop wrestling me and let me up!
2. let up on To release or diminish the pressure on someone or something; ease up on something: Let up on the clutch slowly or you'll stall out the engine. Let up on the new workers; they're doing the best they can.
3. To slow down; diminish: The weather got cold, but the protesters didn't let up in their efforts.
4. To come to a stop; cease: The rain let up, so we went outside and played.
See also: let, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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