let down

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let down

1. verb To cause or allow someone or something to descend. In all usages as a verb, a noun or pronoun can be used between "let" and "down." I'll let down a rope ladder for you to climb up to the treehouse. The helicopter let the rescue worker down on a harness.
2. verb To fail or disappoint someone; to neglect or be unable to do what was wanted, required, or promised to someone. Dad said he'd be here to watch my baseball game, but he let me down again. We're counting on you to close this deal, Robert—don't let down the firm.
3. verb To lower the amount of effort, attention, or focus placed on something. We'll wait long enough for them to let down their guard before we launch our invasion. After her last relationship, she found it hard to let her defenses down around men.
4. verb To lengthen a garment by extending the extra cloth in its hem. I love this dress, but it's just a bit too short. I wonder if my tailor could let it down a bit.
5. verb To make a metal slightly more ductile or malleable in the process of tempering. The blacksmith let the spear down in order to reshape it. We should let down the temper on this steel to give it a bit more flexibility.
6. noun Something that is disappointing or anticlimactic. In this usage, the phrase is often spelled with a hyphen or as a single word. Not getting tickets to the game after my aunt promised them to us is a real let down. I was really excited about my new job, but now that I've been in it for a while, it's kind of been a let-down.
See also: down, let

letdown

Something that is disappointing, usually because it did not meet one's high expectations about it. Not getting tickets to the game after my aunt promised them to us is a real letdown. Sue was really excited about her new position, but now that's she's in it, it seems to be a letdown.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

let someone or something down

Fig. to fail someone or something; to disappoint someone or a group. Please don't let me down. I am depending on you. I let down the entire cast of the play.
See also: down, let

let someone down

to disappoint someone; to fail someone. I'm sorry I let you down. Something came up, and I couldn't meet you. I don't want to let you down, but I can't support you in the election.
See also: down, let

let down

to relax one's efforts or vigilance. Now is no time to let down. Keep on your guard. After the contest was over, Jane let down a bit so she could relax.
See also: down, let
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

let down

1. Cause to descend, lower, as in They let down the sails. [Mid-1100s]
2. Also, let up. Slacken, abate, as in Sales are letting down in this quarter, or They didn't let up in their efforts until the end. The first term dates from the mid-1800s, the variant from the late 1700s.
See also: down, let

let someone down

1. Fail to support someone; also, disappoint someone. For example, I was counting on John to come, but he let me down, or The team didn't want to let down the coach. [Late 1400s] A British phrase with the same meaning is let the side down, alluding to some kind of competition (sports, politics) and dating from the mid-1900s. It is occasionally used in America.
2. let someone down easy. Convey bad or disappointing news in a considerate way, so as to spare the person's self-respect. For example, The teacher knew that Paul would have to repeat the course and that there was no way to let him down easy . [Colloquial; mid-1700s] Also see let down.
See also: down, let, someone
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

let down

v.
1. To cause to fall to a lower level; lower something: The tailor let down the hem of my new pants. If you let your hair down, I can braid it. It's time to let down the sails.
2. To fail to meet the expectations of someone; disappoint someone: The contractor really let us down when the kitchen wasn't ready in time for Thanksgiving. When the school board had to cancel the sports program, they really let down the community.
3. To hinder the success or progress of someone or something: It would have been a good book, but the slow pacing lets it down a bit.
4. To be released from the breast as breast milk: She tried to breastfeed her newborn infant, but her milk wouldn't let down.
See also: down, let
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
She lets him down easy, not wanting to deny who she really is.