let (someone or something) go

(redirected from let you go)

let (someone or something) go

1. To make free or give up control of something or someone; to release or discharge something or someone, as from confinement. Due to a lack of evidence, police had to let the suspects go. I love fishing but hate killing animals, so I let whatever I catch go.
2. To end a professional relationship with someone; to fire someone. A: "Wait, they fired you?" B: "Yes! They just let me go with no explanation!"
See also: go, let

let go

1. To stop physically holding on to someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "let" and "go." If you let go of the ledge, you'll fall! The baby refused to let go of the rattle. He let the rock go, and it was a long time before we heard it hit the bottom.
2. To fire or dismiss an employee. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "let" and "go." I'm worried that they'll let me go once this special project is over. I heard they're going to let go a lot of employees involved in the scandal.
3. To release someone or something from custody. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "let" and "go." We did bring him in for questioning, but we had nothing to charge him with, so we had to let him go. What time did you let go the prisoner?
4. To stop pursuing a particular desire or attempting to maintain a particular situation and accept things as they are. In this usage, the phrase is often "let it go." He's never going to clean the kitchen as diligently as you would—just let it go. It's been 10 years, Ken. I think it's time for you to let go and move on.
5. To relax and not focus on one's responsibilities or stresses. I think I just need a weekend where I can let go for a while and not worry about what's going on at work.
6. To utter some sudden, fierce, or uncontrolled noise. Often followed by "with something." The trapped wolf let go with a bone-chilling howl. I don't know what made him so angry, but he suddenly let go a string of expletives.
See also: go, let
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

let someone go

Euph. to fire someone. They let Jane go from her job. Fm afraid we're going to have to let you go.
See also: go, let

let go

 (with something) and cut loose (with something); let loose (with something)
1. to shout something out or expel something; to shout or express something wildly. The whole team let go with a loud shout. The audience cut loose with a loud cheer.
2. to deliver a strong verbal reprimand. Molly let loose with a tremendous scolding at Dave. Dave cut loose with a vengeful retort.
See also: go, let
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

let go

1. Allow to escape, set free, as in The police decided to let him go. [c. 1300]
2. Also, let go of. Release one's hold on, as in Please let go of my sleeve, or Once he starts on this subject, he never lets go. [Early 1400s]
3. let it go. Allow it to stand or be accepted. For example, Let it go; we needn't discuss it further. This usage is sometimes amplified to let it go at that, meaning "allow matters to stand as they are." [Late 1800s]
4. Cease to employ, dismiss, as in They had to let 20 workers go.
5. Also, let oneself go. Behave without restraint, abandon one's inhibitions; also, neglect one's personal hygiene and appearance. For example, When the music began, Jean let herself go and started a wild dance, or After her husband's death she let herself go, forgetting to bathe and staying in her nightgown all day . The first sense dates from the late 1800s, the second from the early 1900s.
See also: go, let
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ˌlet somebody ˈgo


1 allow somebody to be free: Will they let the hostages go?
2 make somebody have to leave their job: They’re having to let 100 employees go because of falling profits.
See also: go, let, somebody

ˌlet somebody/something ˈgo

,

ˌlet ˈgo (of somebody/something)


1 stop holding somebody/something: Let go of me! You’re hurting!Don’t let go of my hand, or you’ll get lost.
2 give up an idea or an attitude, or control of something: It’s time to let the past go.Some people find it hard to let go of their inhibitions.
See also: go, let, somebody, something
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

let go

To cease to employ; dismiss: had to let 20 workers go.
See also: go, let
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
'But, madam,' says he, 'let me hear them refuse to let you go, then I may be able to speak the plainer.'
I shall let you go this time; but should you ever return I shall take the law into my own hands.
Although a work of inherently fascinating fiction, in the pages of "Before I Let You Go", author Kelly Rimmer deftly explores a hotly divisive topic and asks how far the ties of family love can be stretched before they finally break.
In the three-minute viral video posted on Tuesday by Facebook user Mil Rapinan Tranquilino , Baste was reluctant to sing one of Inday Sara's favorite songs, Before I Let You Go, but eventually gave in to her request.
Baste changed his song, Hoobastank's The Reason, with Before I Let You Go, which was sung by OPM band Freestyle.
The "women with secrets" trend in publishing (Gone Girl, The Girl on the Train) shows no signs of easing with the release of I Let You Go, a gripping debut thriller set in England.
A former law enforcement officer, Mackintosh was inspired to write I Let You Go by a similar real-life case, as well as the loss of her own son, and her experience lends her characters' actions and feelings a visceral realism.
A WOULDN'T it be better to find out first whether your parents will let you go?
The more you follow their rules, the more responsible you'll seem and the more they'll trust you--maybe even let you go to the beach bonfire.
When you feel upset, unwell or low she'll hold you tight and won't let you go.
I'll Let You Go is Wagner's third Hollywood novel, and it is his biggest yet.
If the trappings of I'll Let You Go are right out of the nineteenth century, the characters unmistakably belong to the twenty-first.
sharp, see if she'll let you go 'til 10 for a week--if you can get up in the a.m., the change could be made permanent.
Mom thinks you're too young to go our, restricts phone calls from guys and won't even let you go to boy-girl parties.
If he refuses to let you go next time, then you could take him to an employment tribunal.