let go

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let (oneself) go

1. To behave in a wild or uninhibited manner. I was surprised that she let herself go at the party—she's usually so shy and reserved.
2. To fail to maintain an attractive physical appearance. A: "I was surprised to see that he had gained so much weight." B: "I know, he really let himself go after college."
See also: go, let

let (someone or something) go

1. To make free or give up control of something or someone; to release or discharge something or someone, as from confinement. Due to a lack of evidence, police had to let the suspects go. I love fishing but hate killing animals, so I let whatever I catch go.
2. To end a professional relationship with someone; to fire someone. A: "Wait, they fired you?" B: "Yes! They just let me go with no explanation!"
See also: go, let

let go

1. To stop physically holding on to someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "let" and "go." If you let go of the ledge, you'll fall! The baby refused to let go of the rattle. He let the rock go, and it was a long time before we heard it hit the bottom.
2. To fire or dismiss an employee. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "let" and "go." I'm worried that they'll let me go once this special project is over. I heard they're going to let go a lot of employees involved in the scandal.
3. To release someone or something from custody. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "let" and "go." We did bring him in for questioning, but we had nothing to charge him with, so we had to let him go. What time did you let go the prisoner?
4. To stop pursuing a particular desire or attempting to maintain a particular situation and accept things as they are. In this usage, the phrase is often "let it go." He's never going to clean the kitchen as diligently as you would—just let it go. It's been 10 years, Ken. I think it's time for you to let go and move on.
5. To relax and not focus on one's responsibilities or stresses. I think I just need a weekend where I can let go for a while and not worry about what's going on at work.
6. To utter some sudden, fierce, or uncontrolled noise. Often followed by "with something." The trapped wolf let go with a bone-chilling howl. I don't know what made him so angry, but he suddenly let go a string of expletives.
See also: go, let
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

let someone go

Euph. to fire someone. They let Jane go from her job. Fm afraid we're going to have to let you go.
See also: go, let

let go

 (with something) and cut loose (with something); let loose (with something)
1. to shout something out or expel something; to shout or express something wildly. The whole team let go with a loud shout. The audience cut loose with a loud cheer.
2. to deliver a strong verbal reprimand. Molly let loose with a tremendous scolding at Dave. Dave cut loose with a vengeful retort.
See also: go, let

Let it go.

Forget it.; Stop worrying about it. Don't get so angry about it. Let it go. Let it go. Stop fretting.
See also: go, let

let oneself go

 
1. Fig. to become less constrained; to get excited and have a good time. I love to dance and just let myself go. Let yourself go, John. Learn to enjoy life.
2. Fig. to let one's appearance and health suffer. When I was depressed, I let myself go and was really a mess. He let himself go and gained 30 pounds.
See also: go, let
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

let go

1. Allow to escape, set free, as in The police decided to let him go. [c. 1300]
2. Also, let go of. Release one's hold on, as in Please let go of my sleeve, or Once he starts on this subject, he never lets go. [Early 1400s]
3. let it go. Allow it to stand or be accepted. For example, Let it go; we needn't discuss it further. This usage is sometimes amplified to let it go at that, meaning "allow matters to stand as they are." [Late 1800s]
4. Cease to employ, dismiss, as in They had to let 20 workers go.
5. Also, let oneself go. Behave without restraint, abandon one's inhibitions; also, neglect one's personal hygiene and appearance. For example, When the music began, Jean let herself go and started a wild dance, or After her husband's death she let herself go, forgetting to bathe and staying in her nightgown all day . The first sense dates from the late 1800s, the second from the early 1900s.
See also: go, let
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

let it go (or pass)

choose not to react to an action or remark.
See also: go, let

let yourself go

1 act in an unrestrained or uninhibited way. 2 neglect yourself or your appearance; become careless or untidy in your habits.
See also: go, let
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

let it ˈgo (at ˈthat)

say or do nothing more about something: I could have disagreed with him, but I let it go. I don’t like arguments.The police spoke firmly to the boy about the damage and then let it go at that.
See also: go, let

ˌlet somebody ˈgo


1 allow somebody to be free: Will they let the hostages go?
2 make somebody have to leave their job: They’re having to let 100 employees go because of falling profits.
See also: go, let, somebody

ˌlet yourself ˈgo


1 behave in a relaxed way without worrying about what people think of your behaviour: Come on, enjoy yourself, let yourself go!
2 stop being careful about how you look and dress, etc: He has let himself go since he lost his job.
See also: go, let
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

let go

To cease to employ; dismiss: had to let 20 workers go.
See also: go, let
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in classic literature ?
Most of us like the idea that we could be desperately wicked if only we let ourselves go. For this reason, the Freudian "unconscious" has been a consolation to many quiet and well-behaved persons.
"So have I," answered Sancho, "but if ever I make it, or try it again as long as I live, may this be my last hour; moreover, I have no intention of putting myself in the way of wanting it, for I mean, with all my five senses, to keep myself from being wounded or from wounding anyone: as to being blanketed again I say nothing, for it is hard to prevent mishaps of that sort, and if they come there is nothing for it but to squeeze our shoulders together, hold our breath, shut our eyes, and let ourselves go where luck and the blanket may send us."
"Walk down any street today and one thing becomes immediately clear: we have really let ourselves go. Waistlines are exploding like the national debt.
Summary: At last we can let ourselves go, unleash the shopaholic in ourselves, replace all our ageing and wilting kitchen and bathroom and bedroom ware
FBI's unfortunate opening of investigation of Hillary Clinton right before the 2016 US presidential elections demonstrated all too clearly how mere announcement of references or arrest warrants close to the election can unduly affect the result, and we must not let ourselves go down that path.
It shoves us around with its icy winds, and when we retreat to the warmth of our homes, it taunts us by implying that we have let ourselves go soft.
After all, it's the one time of the year when we really can let ourselves go, and after a rather chaotic and, for many of us, sad 2016, such little moments of cheer really do help.
"We can just let ourselves go, we have already achieved so much," added the Swansea midfielder.
When life is a moving target in this way, the reader might reason, the only way to see it for what it really is, to get our feet onto a stable spot of ground, is to let ourselves go in interludes of what Maron calls "dreams," which encompass sun-blinded reveries, imaginary conversations, and, in the old days, hashish highs.
Maybe as soon as men get married they should be given a pair as about 75% of us let ourselves go after we get hitched so it'll be nice to look buff for our partners for a change, with lazy assistance for those who can't be bothered with the gym.
We all have moments when we just let ourselves go. I didn't have so much of that in my personal life so I did it in my work.
The logical strategy is to let ourselves go in enjoying the unlimited conviviality and communion of the holidays, but to avoid wasting the limited resources.
"It was a big test of characterwhenwewent behind but we didn't let ourselves go and got a goal at the right time.