let off


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Related to let off: let off steam, let off the hook
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let off

1. To allow someone to disembark from a mode of transportation. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "let" and "off." Hey, let me off! This is my stop! I'll be back to the station after I let off the rest of the passengers at the next stop.
2. To pardon, release, or allow someone to escape from blame, responsibility, obligation, or difficulty. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "let" and "off." At first, Sam was suspected of stealing money from the safe, but he was let off after security camera footage showed it was someone else. I was meant to spend the weekend cleaning out the garage, but my wife let me off so I could go on the big fishing trip with my buddies.
3. To release or emit something. I called the repair guy because the furnace suddenly stopped letting off heat last night. We dove for cover when we heard someone suddenly start letting off shots.
See also: let, off

let someone (get) off (something)

to permit someone to disembark, dismount, or leave something. Please move and let me get off the bus. Let her off!
See also: let, off

let someone off (easy)

 and let someone off
to release or dismiss someone without punishment. The judge didn't let me off easy. The judge let off Mary with a warning.
See also: let, off

let something off

to release something; to give something off. The engine let some evil smelling smoke off. The flower let off a wonderful smell.
See also: let, off

let off

1. Release by exploding; see blow off steam.
2. Allow to go free or escape; excuse from punishment. For example, They let her off from attending graduation, or The headmaster let him off with a reprimand. [Early 1800s] Also see off the hook.
See also: let, off

let off

v.
1. To allow someone to disembark from a vehicle: My house is just down the street, but you can let me off at the corner. The bus driver let off the passengers at the terminal.
2. To excuse or pardon someone from something unpleasant, as punishment or work: I'm going to let you off this once, but if I catch you cheating again, you're going to be expelled. The police arrested the leader and let off the rest of the gang with only a warning.
3. To emit something, as heat, gas, or sound: The stove lets off a lot of heat.
4. To detonate or discharge something: The police officer let off a warning shot. We let a firecracker off in the park.
See also: let, off
References in periodicals archive ?
Terrence Grange, of the Association of Chief Police Officers, said every case was looked at on its own merits and offenders were not being "let off" since the caution would still be noted on an individual's criminal record and they would be placed on the sex offenders' register.
Yardley MP John Hemming (Lib Dem) added: 'When thieves are caught and identified, the Government has established rules that result in the criminals being let off with a caution.
Firstly, a 33-year-old policeman who bombarded a girl of 14 with dirty text messages causing her terrible distress was let off with a 160-hour community service order.
If he was to be let off with a fine, then this should have been more commensurate with the total of all losing bets placed on the horses involved.
While Roman Synods provided a forum to "let off steam," they also acted as correctives, strengthening the bonds between bishops and popes in the common search for truth.
Particularly grotesque is the technique known as "getting a promise." Lawyers are thought to be within their rights if they inquire whether a prospective juror's conscience would forbid him to enforce the law as it stands: The best-known example is that persons can be let off capital juries if their philosophical objections to the death penalty would keep them from voting to convict even if a crime were proved.
The tension is 1,000-3,000 N and can be adjusted in accordance with the type of fabric to be let off.
For him, the anti-Pinochet theater, magazines, and coffeehouses that nourish the opposition are an escape valve created by the regime to let off pressure.
Two of the mountain's former eruptions were spaced only two years apart, Yamaguchi says, and "since it [last] let off in 1980, it has the potential to produce another eruption fairly soon."
SUKKUR -- Members of the Kato community living in Jacobabad took out a rally on Sunday against the Jamshoro administration and police over allegedly letting off the man involved in a road accident that had left seven members of a family dead near Looni Kot on Superhighway about a month ago.Leading the rally from DC Chowk to the local press club, elders of the Kato community told local reporters that the Jamshoro police had let off the driver of the vehicle involved in the accident 'at the behest of the MPA from Shikarpur'.
FRIENDS, family and former colleagues of Danny Fox let off balloons in St Helens town centre yesterday in a final farewell to the beloved 29-year-old.
A SOLDIER who sparked chaos at a football match when he let off a smoke bomb has been jailed for five months.
EIGHTEEN years after a massive fire raged through the Uphaar theatre in South Delhi's Green Park area snuffing out 59 lives, the Supreme Court on Wednesday let off its owners Sushil Ansal and his brother Gopal Ansal merely asking them to pay a fine of ` 30 crore each to Delhi government within three months.
On Wednesday, the grand jury in New York state let off a white police officer, Donald Pantaleo, for chokeholding Eric Garner, a 43-year-old father of six, who was illegally selling cigarettes on Staten Island.
A COCAINE addict who let off a smoke bomb to distract people while he raided a restaurant was forced to flee when he could not find the till in the fog, a court heard.