let loose of

let loose of (someone or something)

1. To release one's grip on someone or something. Please let loose of me—you're hurting my arm! The child let loose of the string, and the balloon floated up and away into the sky.
2. To allow someone to become independent; to free someone from one's control or authority. It is always hard as a parent to let loose of your child when they grow older. I heard they're letting loose of a lot of high-level employees after the scandal.
3. To dismiss someone from one's employment. Used especially in sports contexts. He was the team's single highest scorer last season, so it makes no sense that they would let loose of him now.
4. To lose control to some emotion or internal state; to allow something to be free within oneself. The resort attracts tourists of all ages and backgrounds eager to let loose of their inhibitions for the weekend. After such a stuffy, unromantic first marriage, it is so refreshing to be able to let loose of my desires with my new lover.
See also: let, loose, of

let loose of someone or something

 
1. to loosen the grasp on someone or something. Please let loose of me! Will you let loose of the doorknob?
2. to become independent from someone or something. She is nearly forty years old and has not yet let loose of her mother. Dave can't let loose of his childhood.
See also: let, loose, of
References in periodicals archive ?
The Angels once again let loose of heavy-scoring imports Wilma Salas and Janisa Johnson to fashion out the easy win.
Two hundred feet above the ground, electricians for Olsson Industrial, Jeff Jacobson (above left) and Dana Gillespie, let loose of a broken 50-pound light assembly as it is carried away by a Weyerhaeuser helicopter.
CHRIS PIETSCH / The Register-Guard Two hundred feet above the ground, electricians for Olsson Industrial, Jeff Jacobson (above left) and Dana Gillespie, let loose of a broken 50-pound light assembly as it is carried away by a Weyerhaeuser helicopter.