let (someone or something) get out

let (someone or something) get out

1. To allow someone or an animal to leave (some particular place or thing). The bus driver pulled up to the curb and let everyone get out. You should let the dogs get out of the house for a while so they can burn off some energy.
2. To allow someone or some group to avoid some requirement or obligation. The contract you signed is iron-clad. There's no way they'll let you get out without paying some kind of penalty. I can't believe the government let the company get out of paying the full amount of back-taxes they owed.
3. To reveal or disclose something, usually of a private or secret nature. Don't let it get out, but we're having a surprise party for Miranda next weekend. I've been trying not to let this news get out yet.
See also: get, let, out
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