lend itself to (something)

(redirected from lent itself to)

lend itself to (something)

To be suited for something, especially some kind of purpose or use. This fabric really lends itself to evening wear. The chefs are always looking for versatile ingredients that lend themselves to many dishes.
See also: itself, lend

lend itself to

Adapt to, be suitable for. For example, The Bible lends itself to numerous interpretations, or This plot of land lends itself to a variety of uses. [Mid-1800s]
See also: itself, lend
References in classic literature ?
The background lent itself to allusions to European scenes; and May, who was looking her loveliest under a wide-brimmed hat that cast a shadow of mystery over her too-clear eyes, kindled into eagerness as he spoke of Granada and the Alhambra.
I had been used to the pleasures of variety, to the luxury and stir of life in Paris; it was only when I had overcome my first repugnance that I saw the advantages of this existence; how it lent itself to continuity of thought and to involuntary meditation; how a life in which the heart has undisturbed sway seems to widen and grow vast as the sea.
Summary: New Delhi [India], August 24 (ANI): The phenomenon of social media obsession has lent itself to many a stories and now it lends itself to a full-fledged thriller titled 'Social'.
The slabs' rectilinear shape lent itself to several other abstract paintings in which the various forms, now divorced from any narrative context, filled the canvas from edge to edge.
In spite of - or indeed perhaps because of - its awkwardness, the site's shape lent itself to division into different areas, and to spatial drama.
The addition of several major distributors and further penetration of the "doctor direct" market has lent itself to this success.
As painting was regaining a respectability and a prominence it had lacked for over a decade, the clear intelligence of Salle's work, and the neatness with which it lent itself to a new theoretical vocabulary of appropriation and the simulacrum, made him stand out.
Because of its promotional nature, GUTS lent itself to frequent, short plays -- ideal for that business model.
The fitful, scattered composition that has long been his signature has never lent itself to the stentorian delivery of the mural--his citations of Roman antiquity abjure the rhetoric of the exemplary to present themselves as the private musings of a learned amateur--nor even to anything like the sublime ungraspability of the pictorial field in Barnett Newman's biggest paintings.