lent


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

lend an ear (to one)

To listen to one, especially when they are discussing a problem. Sorry I'm late, I had to lend an ear to Jane. She's been going through a lot lately. Thank you for lending an ear, I feel much better now that I've gotten that off my chest. Please lend an ear to Ian, who will be giving us an update about the last quarter.
See also: ear, lend

lend itself to (something)

To be suited for something, especially some kind of purpose or use. This fabric really lends itself to evening wear. The chefs are always looking for versatile ingredients that lend themselves to many dishes.
See also: itself, lend

lend a hand

To help. A noun or pronoun can be used between "lend" and "a." If you can lend a hand, we could use some more help in the kitchen. Lend your mother a hand in the kitchen, will you?
See also: hand, lend

lend (one) a hand

To help one; to give one assistance. If you lend me a hand, I can get this done much faster. Lend your mother a hand in the kitchen, will you?
See also: hand, lend

lend color to (something)

To embellish something; to add information or details to something, especially to make it seem more credible or probable. He splashed mud all over his car and clothes to lend color to his story about being in the mountains all weekend. We cannot do anything that will lend color to our opponents' allegations about us.
See also: color, lend

lend support to (something)

1. To embellish something; to add information or details to something, especially to make it seem more credible or probable. He splashed mud all over his car and clothes to lend support to his story about being in the mountains all weekend. We cannot do anything that will lend support to our opponents' allegations about us.
2. To give something one's support or assistance. The president is lending support to the governor's re-election campaign. Your department will have responsibility for the project, but the sales team will lend support if needed.
See also: lend, support

lend weight to (something)

To embellish something; to add information or details to something, especially to make it seem more credible or probable. He splashed mud all over his car and clothes to lend weight to his story about being in the mountains all weekend. We cannot do anything that will lend weight to our opponents' allegations about us.
See also: lend, weight

lend credence to (something)

To embellish something; to add information or details to something, especially to make it seem more credible or probable. He splashed mud all over his car and clothes to lend credence to his story about being in the mountains all weekend. We cannot do anything that will lend credence to our opponents' allegations about us.
See also: credence, lend

lend (one's) name to (something)

To give one's formal and public support to something. Now that we've got a big movie star lending his name to our campaign, we're finally starting to get the traction we've wanted.
See also: lend, name

lend (one's) ear to (someone or something)

To listen carefully or pay close attention (to someone or something). Be sure to lend your ear to the artist's newest album. I know we're supposed to lend our ear's to the safety presentation before each flight, but I've seen it so many times that I just tune it out now.
See also: ear, lend

lend (one) (something)

To allow one to borrow or make use of something temporarily. I can lend you $20, but I'll need it back by this weekend. Would you mind lending me a pencil? I forgot to bring one.
See also: lend

lend (something) out (to one)

To allow someone to borrow or make use of something temporarily. Normally not used in reference to money. Some linguists, especially in British English, believe that "lend" should only be used as a noun, while the correct verb is only "lend." I can't come pick you up tonight—I lent the car out to your brother. I stopped lending my books out to friends because I never get them back.
See also: lend, out

*busy as a beaver (building a new dam)

 and *busy as a bee; *busy as a one-armed paperhanger; *busy as Grand Central Station; *busy as a cat on a hot tin roof; *busy as a fish peddler in Lent; *busy as a cranberry merchant (at Thanksgiving); *busy as popcorn on a skillet
very busy. (*Also: as ~.) My boss keeps me as busy as a one-armed paperhanger. I don't have time to talk to you. I'm as busy as a beaver. When the tourist season starts, this store is busy as Grand Central Station. Sorry I can't go to lunch with you. I'm as busy as a beaver building a new dam. Prying into other folks' business kept him busy as popcorn on a skillet.
See also: beaver, busy

lend a hand

(to someone) Go to lend (someone) a hand.
See also: hand, lend

lend (someone) a hand

 and lend a hand (to someone)
Fig. to give someone some help, not necessarily with the hands. Could you lend me a hand with this piano? I need to move it across the room. Could you lend a hand with this math assignment? I'd be happy to lend a hand.
See also: hand, lend

busy as a beaver

Also, busy as a bee. Hardworking, very industrious, as in With all her activities, Sue is always busy as a bee, or Bob's busy as a beaver trying to finish painting before it rains. The comparison to beavers dates from the late 1700s, the variant from the late 1300s. Also see eager beaver; work like a beaver.
See also: beaver, busy

lend a hand

Also, lend a helping hand. Be of assistance, as in Can you lend them a hand with putting up the flag, or Peter is always willing to lend a helping hand around the house. [Late 1500s]
See also: hand, lend

lend (somebody) a ˈhand (with something)

help somebody (to do something): I saw two men pushing a broken-down car along the road so I stopped to lend them a hand.She stayed with us for three weeks and didn’t once lend a hand with the housework!
See also: hand, lend

lend a hand

To be of assistance.
See also: hand, lend
References in periodicals archive ?
Another secret some of us need to know though we might not believe it until we get there: Most of what we take on for Lent isn't done so we can let it go at Easter.
How can we get into some good habits, virtues that will take shape in Lent and maybe last on and on?
Lent gets down deep so that we finally see that the alms required of us are stopping this runaway train we're on.
But one thing for sure is this: every Catholic should celebrate the sacrament of Reconciliation during Lent.
Whatever our pattern might be the rest of the year, Lent is a time to celebrate this sacrament.
Lent is a time to rediscover these traditions of prayer, try them out, and spend 15 minutes each day enjoying them.
Indeed, the thing Mike Thompson says he wishes he could do for Lent is to "always focus on changing more toward what Christ has taught us--instead of focusing on some kind of superficial sacrifice.
WHAT READERS DECIDED to do for Lent last year bore a resemblance of sorts to their "best ever" experiences.
It's also interesting to ask the question, "If your best Lent was had by doing X, Y, or Z--why aren't you doing a repeat performance this year?
Solari believes that Lent is difficult for children to understand.
As the process of Lent goes on, I find myself becoming more aware of God's presence and my need for God.
White, a retreat director at the Christian Brothers LaSalle Manor Retreat Center in Plano, Illinois, believes that Lent offers Christians the opportunity to conduct a social, spiritual, and emotional inventory of themselves and figure out how to strengthen their weak spots.
It's more beneficial to do something positive or productive during Lent than to give something up.
People often give up things for Lent for selfish reasons.
I feel guilty when I don't give something up for Lent.