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a new lease of life

1. An occasion or opportunity for a renewed enjoyment in, enthusiasm for, or appreciation of one's life. Primarily heard in UK. After finding out that the tests came back negative for cancer, I feel as though I've been given a new lease of life! Mary's gotten a new lease of life ever since her daughter was born.
2. An extension or increase in the time in which something or someone can be useful or successful. Primarily heard in UK. Our company was given a new lease of life when we partnered with the global corporation. John's film got a new lease of life when his wealthy grandfather agreed to fund the rest of the production.
See also: lease, life, new, of

new lease on life

A new chance to happy, healthy, or successful after surviving a hardship. After the doctor declared that her cancer was in remission, Harriet felt like she had a new lease on life.
See also: lease, life, new, on

a new lease on life

An occasion or opportunity for a renewed enjoyment in, enthusiasm for, or appreciation of one's life. After finding out that the tests came back negative, I feel as though I've been given a new lease on life! Mary's gotten a new lease on life ever since her daughter was born.
See also: lease, life, new, on

give a new lease of life

1. To give one occasion or opportunity for a renewed enjoyment in, enthusiasm for, or appreciation of one's life. A noun or pronoun can be used between "give" and "a." After finding out that the tests came back negative for cancer, I feel as though I've been given a new lease of life!
2. To improve or refurbish something that is worn or old. A noun or pronoun can be used between "give" and "a." That new engine has really given my car a new lease of life.
See also: give, lease, life, new, of

lease up

1. To grant the use or occupation of an entire building or premises under the terms of a lease. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "lease" and "up." An investment group bought the entire property, kicked out the previous tenants, and leased it up at much higher rates to foreign businesses. They managed to lease up the house after it had been on the market for less than a month.
2. To be granted use or occupation under the terms of a lease. How long do you think it will take for the house to lease up in the current market conditions?
See also: lease, up

lease something back

to sell something, then rent it from the buyer. We sold the building to a real estate firm and then leased it back. There was some tax saving involved. We leased back the building.
See also: back, lease

lease something from someone

to rent something from someone. We decided to lease the building from the owner rather than buying it. The company always leases its cars from the dealership.
See also: lease

lease something (out) to someone

to rent something to someone. The company leases cars out to its customers. Can you lease this building to me for two years? Lease out only the first two floors.
See also: lease

new lease on life

Cliché a renewed and revitalized outlook on life. Getting the job offer was a new lease on life. When I got out of the hospital, I felt as if I had a new lease on life.
See also: lease, life, new, on

new lease on life

A fresh start; renewed vigor and good health, as in Since they bought his store Dad has had a new lease on life. This term with its allusion to a rental agreement dates from the early 1800s and originally referred only to recovery from illness. By the mid-1800s it was applied to any kind of fresh beginning.
See also: lease, life, new, on

a new lease of life

BRITISH, AMERICAN or

a new lease on life

BRITISH
COMMON If someone or something is given a new lease of life or a new lease on life, something makes them successful once again or improves their condition. The old oak table was another bargain, picked up for just £4 and given a new lease of life by Kim's mother. After a career as a comedian, he found a new lease of life as an actor. Swimming gave me a new lease on life — I found I had much more energy to do stuff. Note: Words such as another, fresh, or second are sometimes used instead of new. T-shirts and hats can be given a fresh lease of life with glass beads. Note: A lease is a contract by which you can rent property for a fixed period of time.
See also: lease, life, new, of

a new lease of (or on) life

a substantially improved prospect of life or use after rejuvenation or repair.
1997 BBC Vegetarian Good Food Give salads, sandwiches and jacket spuds a new lease of life with a spoonful of flavoured mayonnaise.
See also: lease, life, new, of

a (ˌnew) lease of ˈlife

(British English) (American English a (ˌnew) lease on ˈlife) a chance for somebody/something to live/last longer; a chance to get more enjoyment and satisfaction out of life: The successful heart operation gave him a new lease of life.The outside of the city hall has just been thoroughly cleaned and it’s given the old place a new lease on life.
See also: lease, life, of

lease up

v.
1. To fully lease some building: The housing agency leased up the new apartment building in record time. After the new building had been on the market for only one week, the real estate agent had leased it up. The retail spaces were leased up before construction even started.
2. To become fully leased: The new office building leased up in less than a week.
See also: lease, up

a new lease on life

An opportunity to improve one's circumstances or outlook.
See also: lease, life, new, on
References in periodicals archive ?
Understanding your company's needs, plans and specific financial position are critical when considering a leasing arrangement.
The redevelopment projects within the FMP portfolio are exciting and dynamic and I believe I will add significant value to the properties throughout all stages of repositioning with my leasing and remerchandising expertise.
Leasing offers a low initial investment because large capital outlays are avoided and working capital is preserved.
The healthcare equipment leasing market is projected to exceed $8 billion in volume by 2007, attributable mainly to forecasted equipment sales growth (as opposed to significant gains in lease penetration).
Through this program, NEC is offering two different and compelling leasing options:
According to the study, an absence of leasing would result in the following (in addition to the previously noted permanent reduction in real GDP of $75 billion annually):
110 William Street's new leasing activity includes Next Level Media Group; Wilentz, Goldman & Spitzer; Bolton St.
The leasing industry agrees with the regulators' current thinking that the right to use a leased asset is an asset and the obligation to pay rent should be capitalized, but there should also be a place for not capitalizing certain leases.
One downside of leasing can be the obligation to make all payments to end the lease--but you can mitigate that by switching to products that suit you better, rather than terminating the agreement with nothing.
The certificate provides the detailed rationale for leasing the proposed items versus selling them.
The Federal Reserve Board on August 2, 2000, announced a new education resource designed to help consumers learn more about vehicle leasing.
The TRA '97 more clearly defined the tax treatment of certain leasing arrangements, but, in general, much ambiguity remains.
commercial leasing accounts for more capital equipment acquisitions than corporate bonds, equity or commercial bank debt, and in 1995, 80% of all U.
What makes leasing so hot now is that auto dealers and manufacturers, anxious to get out of the recession doldrums, are granting bigger discounts on leases.
The concept of leasing recreational access to hunters, fishermen, and campers is now an accepted practice in much of the United States.