leash

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keep (someone) on a short leash

To maintain strict or tight control over someone; to not allow someone very much independence or autonomy. Ever since George nearly lost his life savings in a drunken poker match, his husband started keeping him on a short leash. The boss has kept her assistant on a short leash ever since she hired her.
See also: keep, leash, on, short

have (someone) on a tight leash

To maintain strict or tight control over someone; to not allow someone very much independence or autonomy. Poor George seems like he doesn't get out too much these days. I think his husband has him on a tight leash. The boss has had her assistant on a tight leash ever since she hired her.
See also: have, leash, on, tight

be kept on a tight leash

To be strictly controlled (by someone); to not be allowed very much independence or autonomy. George has been kept on a tight leash by his husband ever since he gambled away their life savings at a poker match. Everyone feels like they've been kept on a tight leash ever since that new manager took over.
See also: kept, leash, on, tight

be kept on a short leash

To be strictly controlled (by someone); to not be allowed very much independence or autonomy. George has been kept on a short leash by his husband ever since he gambled away their life savings at a poker match. Everyone feels like they've been kept on a short leash ever since that new manager took over.
See also: kept, leash, on, short

be on a tight leash

To be strictly controlled (by someone); to not be allowed very much independence or autonomy. George has been on a tight leash with his husband ever since he gambled away their life savings at a poker match. Everyone feels like they're on a tight leash at the office ever since that new manager took over.
See also: leash, on, tight

be on a short leash

To be strictly controlled (by someone); to not be allowed very much independence or autonomy. George has been on a short leash with his husband ever since he gambled away their life savings at a poker match. Everyone feels like they're on a short leash at the office ever since that new manager took over.
See also: leash, on, short

short leash

A phrase that highlights one's lack of independence or autonomy due to being strongly controlled by another. George has been on a short leash with his husband ever since he gambled away their life savings at a poker match. Everyone feels like they're on a short leash at the office ever since that new manager took over.
See also: leash, short

strain at the leash

To try to take action, especially when faced with obstacles. The phrase alludes to a dog pulling at its leash because it wants to walk at a different pace or in a different direction than its owner. Ever since she got her driver's license, my daughter has been straining at the leash for more freedom.
See also: leash, strain

have (one) on a short leash

To maintain strict or tight control over one; to not allow one very much independence or autonomy. Poor George seems like doesn't get out too much these days. I think his husband has him on a short leash. The boss has had her assistant on a short leash ever since she hired her.
See also: have, leash, on, short

keep (one) on a tight leash

To maintain strict or tight control over one; to not allow one very much independence or autonomy. Ever since Sarah lost their life savings in a drunken poker match, her husband started keeping her on a tight leash. The boss has kept her assistant on a tight leash ever since she hired him.
See also: keep, leash, on, tight

on a short leash

With strict, overbearing control that limit's one's independence or autonomy. George has been on a short leash with his husband ever since he gambled away their life savings at a poker match. The boss has had her assistant on a short leash ever since she hired her.
See also: leash, on, short

long leash

A phrase indicating that one is given a lot of independence or is not under very strict control by someone else. Her parents giver her quite a long leash, so it doesn't surprise me that she gets up to as much trouble as she does. They may be regretting the long leash they gave their candidate ahead of the campaign.
See also: leash, long

on a tight leash

Under (someone's) strict control; not allowed (by someone) to have very much independence or autonomy. Ever since George nearly lost his life savings in a drunken poker match, his husband started keeping him on a tight leash. Everyone feels like they're on a tight leash at the office ever since that new manager took over.
See also: leash, on, tight

have (one's) brain on a leash

slang To be drunk. Do you remember last night at the bar at all? You really had your brain on a leash!
See also: brain, have, leash, on

have one's brain on a leash

Sl. to be drunk. Maxhad his brain on a leash before he even got to the party. Some guy who had his brain on a leash ran his car off the road.
See also: brain, have, leash, on

on a tight leash

 
1. Lit. [of an animal] on a leash, held tightly and close to its owner. I keep my dog on a tight leash so it won't bother people.
2. Fig. under very careful control. My father keeps my brother on a tight leash. We can't do much around here. The boss has us all on a tight leash.
3. Sl. addicted to some drug. Wilbur is on a tight leash. He has to have the stuff regularly. Gert is kept on a tight leash by her habit.
See also: leash, on, tight

strain at the leash

 
1. Lit. [for a dog] to pull very hard on its leash. It's hard to walk Fido, because he is always straining at the leash. I wish that this dog would not strain at the leash. It's very hard on me.
2. Fig. [for a person] to want to move ahead with things, aggressively and independently. She wants to fix things right away. She is straining at the leash to get started. Paul is straining at the leash to get on the job.
See also: leash, strain

be straining at the leash

If someone is straining at the leash, they are very eager to do things. Note: A `leash' is a long thin piece of leather or chain, which you attach to a dog's collar so that you can keep the dog under control. The players all know that there are plenty of youngsters straining at the leash to take their places if they don't perform.
See also: leash, strain

a long leash

If someone is given a long leash, they are allowed a lot of freedom to do what they want. Note: A `leash' is a long thin piece of leather or chain, which you attach to a dog's collar so that you can keep the dog under control. He thinks it best to let people have a long leash. `If some want to make fools of themselves, I let them do that, too.' Inga knew that she had to give Judd a long leash or he would have left her. Note: You can say that someone is given a longer leash if they are given more freedom. At the beginning of the campaign, the Republican candidate was given a longer leash than ever before.
See also: leash, long

on a short leash

or

on a tight leash

If someone is on a short leash or on a tight leash, they are only allowed a small amount of freedom to do what they want. Note: A `leash' is a long thin piece of leather or chain, which you attach to a dog's collar so that you can keep the dog under control. Refusing to comment, the spokeswoman said: `I am on a very short leash on this subject.' The government kept its troops on a tight leash. Note: You can also just say that someone is on a leash with the same meaning. He has demonstrated time and time again that he needs to be kept on a leash. Note: You can say that someone is on a shorter leash or on a tighter leash if they are given less freedom. Everybody's treated a little different. Some guys are on a shorter leash than others. These scandals have prompted boards to put executives on a tighter leash.
See also: leash, on, short

strain at the leash

be eager to begin or do something.
See also: leash, strain

strain at the ˈleash

(informal) want to be free from control; want to do something very much: Why don’t you let her leave home? Can’t you see she’s straining at the leash?He’s straining at the leash to leave Britain for somewhere sunnier.
A leash is a long piece of leather, chain or rope used for holding and controlling a dog.
See also: leash, strain

have one’s brain on a leash

tv. to be drunk. Wayne had his brain on a leash before he even got to the party.
See also: brain, have, leash, on

on a tight leash

1. mod. under very careful control. We can’t do much around here. The boss has us all on a tight leash.
2. mod. addicted to some drug. Wilmer is on a tight leash. He has to have the stuff regularly.
See also: leash, on, tight
References in periodicals archive ?
These leads shine out in the open: They give your dog plenty of room to run around you and explore, without having to trip over and maneuver 15 or so feet of line yourself (we would avoid longer retractable leashes).
They also suggest it is possible that what has been interpreted as leashes are instead a symbolic connection between human and dog.
Agrium responded by filing its own proxy solicitation materials in which it termed the JANA pay plan a "golden leash" and attacked the arrangement as "unheard of in Canada." (89) Agrium argued that the golden leashes undermined the JANA nominees' independence and were "structured to incentivize short-term actions, even if they are taken at the expense of greater long-term value." (90) JANA ultimately lost the election for reasons that likely had little to do with the golden leash arrangements.
Leashes also protect the dogs from large predators and from porcupines, poisonous snakes, and natural traps.
Dogs on leashes are allowed in designated areas (watch for signs) of the following preserves: Windy Hill, Portola Valley; Fremont Older, Cupertino; and Long Ridge, Saratoga.
McGuire posted the leash law on the property, requiring all dogs on public land to be on leashes at all times.
New Legacy Leashes and Collars come in hues of brown, black, and beige to match the Legacy Totes and Carriers.
Tobia then parlayed his knowledge of straps, buckles, and the like into further pet products--including collars, leashes and harnesses that can be spotted 1,000 feet away in the dark.
Hence my solution: Allow dogs to greet and interact only in a safely enclosed area, where leashes can be dropped with a "go play" cue when it's evident the dogs are compatible.
Merry Jane and Thor offers traditional leashes, buckle and martingale collars providing protection and security your dog demands.
The ghost leashes are white leashes that can be found in locations around the city, each with information about how to get involved in the Pedigree Adoption Drive campaign.
Before you get started, you will need to sort through the many styles of harnesses and leashes available.
Smith also leashes Norma Jean, her 11-year-old American Eskimo/shepherd mix, because the dog can be unpredictable when moving through a park or meeting strangers.
In response to this desire, Stylie Dog offers a full line of the chic dog accessories, from collars to leashes to collapsible water bowls, as well as their flagship product: the patented Leash Pack, a small nylon pouch that strings onto a leash to carry keys, plastic bags and the like while out on walks.
This leash uses Ruffwear's "Wavelength stretch webbing," which is not made of fabric-covered rubber bands as in some stretchy leashes, but made of a unique woven elastic webbing.