lease

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a new lease of life

1. An occasion or opportunity for a renewed enjoyment in, enthusiasm for, or appreciation of one's life. Primarily heard in UK. After finding out that the tests came back negative for cancer, I feel as though I've been given a new lease of life! Mary's gotten a new lease of life ever since her daughter was born.
2. An extension or increase in the time in which something or someone can be useful or successful. Primarily heard in UK. Our company was given a new lease of life when we partnered with the global corporation. John's film got a new lease of life when his wealthy grandfather agreed to fund the rest of the production.
See also: lease, life, new, of

new lease on life

A new chance to happy, healthy, or successful after surviving a hardship. After the doctor declared that her cancer was in remission, Harriet felt like she had a new lease on life.
See also: lease, life, new, on

a new lease on life

An occasion or opportunity for a renewed enjoyment in, enthusiasm for, or appreciation of one's life. After finding out that the tests came back negative, I feel as though I've been given a new lease on life! Mary's gotten a new lease on life ever since her daughter was born.
See also: lease, life, new, on

give a new lease of life

1. To give one occasion or opportunity for a renewed enjoyment in, enthusiasm for, or appreciation of one's life. A noun or pronoun can be used between "give" and "a." After finding out that the tests came back negative for cancer, I feel as though I've been given a new lease of life!
2. To improve or refurbish something that is worn or old. A noun or pronoun can be used between "give" and "a." That new engine has really given my car a new lease of life.
See also: give, lease, life, new, of

lease up

1. To grant the use or occupation of an entire building or premises under the terms of a lease. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "lease" and "up." An investment group bought the entire property, kicked out the previous tenants, and leased it up at much higher rates to foreign businesses. They managed to lease up the house after it had been on the market for less than a month.
2. To be granted use or occupation under the terms of a lease. How long do you think it will take for the house to lease up in the current market conditions?
See also: lease, up

lease back

1. To rent a property from the person or company to whom one sold it. The only way we could avoid losing our home was to sell it to the bank and then lease it back again.
2. To rent a property to the person or company from whom one bought it. The government is offering to buy up properties from people with vastly inflated mortgages and lease them back to them for much lower monthly amounts.
See also: back, lease

lease (something) from (someone or something)

To rent a property from some person, group, or company. We're actually leasing the space directly from the government, who gave us a great discount on our monthly payments. I'm leasing the office from my father-in-law while I get my business set up.
See also: lease

lease (something) to (someone or something)

To rent a property to some person, group, or company. We actually lease the land to the oil companies while the dig for oil, and we get a percentage of the profit should they find anything. I'm leasing the office to my son-in-law while he gets his business set up.
See also: lease

lease something back

to sell something, then rent it from the buyer. We sold the building to a real estate firm and then leased it back. There was some tax saving involved. We leased back the building.
See also: back, lease

lease something from someone

to rent something from someone. We decided to lease the building from the owner rather than buying it. The company always leases its cars from the dealership.
See also: lease

lease something (out) to someone

to rent something to someone. The company leases cars out to its customers. Can you lease this building to me for two years? Lease out only the first two floors.
See also: lease

new lease on life

Cliché a renewed and revitalized outlook on life. Getting the job offer was a new lease on life. When I got out of the hospital, I felt as if I had a new lease on life.
See also: lease, life, new, on

new lease on life

A fresh start; renewed vigor and good health, as in Since they bought his store Dad has had a new lease on life. This term with its allusion to a rental agreement dates from the early 1800s and originally referred only to recovery from illness. By the mid-1800s it was applied to any kind of fresh beginning.
See also: lease, life, new, on

a new lease of life

BRITISH, AMERICAN or

a new lease on life

BRITISH
COMMON If someone or something is given a new lease of life or a new lease on life, something makes them successful once again or improves their condition. The old oak table was another bargain, picked up for just £4 and given a new lease of life by Kim's mother. After a career as a comedian, he found a new lease of life as an actor. Swimming gave me a new lease on life — I found I had much more energy to do stuff. Note: Words such as another, fresh, or second are sometimes used instead of new. T-shirts and hats can be given a fresh lease of life with glass beads. Note: A lease is a contract by which you can rent property for a fixed period of time.
See also: lease, life, new, of

a new lease of (or on) life

a substantially improved prospect of life or use after rejuvenation or repair.
1997 BBC Vegetarian Good Food Give salads, sandwiches and jacket spuds a new lease of life with a spoonful of flavoured mayonnaise.
See also: lease, life, new, of

a (ˌnew) lease of ˈlife

(British English) (American English a (ˌnew) lease on ˈlife) a chance for somebody/something to live/last longer; a chance to get more enjoyment and satisfaction out of life: The successful heart operation gave him a new lease of life.The outside of the city hall has just been thoroughly cleaned and it’s given the old place a new lease on life.
See also: lease, life, of

lease up

v.
1. To fully lease some building: The housing agency leased up the new apartment building in record time. After the new building had been on the market for only one week, the real estate agent had leased it up. The retail spaces were leased up before construction even started.
2. To become fully leased: The new office building leased up in less than a week.
See also: lease, up

a new lease on life

An opportunity to improve one's circumstances or outlook.
See also: lease, life, new, on

new lease on life, a

Renewed health and vigor; a fresh start, or opportunity for improvement. This seemingly very modern expression alluding to a new rental agreement dates from the early nineteenth century. Sir Walter Scott used it in a letter of 1809 concerning an invalid friend who appeared to be improving: “My friend has since taken out a new lease of life and . . . may . . . live as long as I shall.” By the mid-nineteenth century it had been transferred to any kind of fresh start.
See also: lease, new, on
References in periodicals archive ?
Advance planning in structuring the lease terms could have led to more favorable tax treatment.
This issue, Impact of Nonsubstantive Lessors, Residual Value Guarantees, and Other Provisions in Leasing Transactions, considers whether a lessee should consolidate a special-purpose entity (SPE) lessor in a transaction structured to be an operating lease.
New leases at 5 Hanover Square included Rainbow Push--Wall Street; Tompkins & Davidson; XcitekSolutionsPlus, LLC; Boys & Girls Clubs of America; and Downing & Peck.
If the current lease rules are as seriously flawed as FASB insists, it could choose to make interim adjustments to FAS 13 to eliminate synthetic leases and expand disclosure requirements in order to create the desired transparency.
Another section of the lease agreement refers to a tenant's improvements and betterments.
* Summary Lease Report - This report lists the number of all leases by country.
INTEREST AND LATE CHARGES: Most leases require you to pay interest or late charges if payments are made.
Another type of lease inducement is a rent holiday.
You should look for leasing firms that provide: precise, proper documentation; all types of leases; support programs during the lease; and cost/benefit analysis and assistance.
On a technical level, the Board questions why section 3 (making certain "conforming amendments" to the Truth in Lending Act) strikes various references to "consumer leases," "lessors," and "lessees" that are found in the Truth in Lending Act, as consumer leases are--and would remain under H.R.4497--subject to the consumer leasing provisions found in chapter 5 of that act.
According to San Antonio-based hunting expert Hal Swiggart, there would be little hunting in the state without the lease system.
* Two seven-year leases totaling 5,647 s/f lease at 34 W.
The Internal Revenue Service recently promulgated final regulations under section 467,(1)(*) which addresses leases of tangible property where the rental agreement has (1) increasing or decreasing rents, or (2) deferred or prepaid rent.
Things get a little tricky if your employer (or a company you own) leases a car for you as a fringe benefit.
The acquisition of real property leases continues to provide tax planning opportunities.