learn of (someone or something)

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learn of (someone or something)

To discover or become informed about someone or something. By the time I learned of his treachery, he had already escaped with the diamonds. We've learned of an artist in the south of France who would be perfect for our project.
See also: learn, of
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

learn of someone or something

to find out about someone or something. Fm not in the telephone book. How did you learn of me? How did you learn of our company?
See also: learn, of
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in classic literature ?
Homer and Milton, who, though they added the ornament of numbers to their works, were both historians of our order, were masters of all the learning of their times.
10 It must be mentioned also that the learning of this age has left permanent traces of its influence on these fables, ll by causing the interpolation with them of some of those amusing stories which were so frequently introduced into the public discourses of the great preachers of those days, and of which specimens are yet to be found in the extant sermons of Jean Raulin, Meffreth, and Gabriel Barlette.
We used the CoRT Breadth thinking skills (de Bono, 2000) to teach students problem-based learning of bird habitat adaptations.
I found, however, that the time spent at the Humane Society was of more benefit to my learning of operant conditioning than time spent at home studying.
Each similarly defines training as the "planned effort by an organization to facilitate employees' learning of job-related competencies." (1)
More recent literature continues to address this issue, and a few examples suggest the breadth of current research and theory on the topic: Carey (1998) has linked information literacy to learning theory in general and to higher-order thinking skills in particular; Kuhlthau (1999) has chronicled the views of participants in the Dewitt-Wallace Reader's Digest Fund's Library Power Project on the relationship of the library media center to learning; McGregor (1998) has examined the relationship between learning and the everyday details of the research process as understood by students; and Todd has looked both at the impact on content learning of integrated information-skills instruction (1997) and at the way information use changes the cognitive models of adolescent girls (1999).
However, applications of LTCC have not yet examined the influences on career learning of discrimination that is based on race, ethnicity, gender, and social class.
The cognitive paradigm applies research developments in psychomotor skill learning (e.g., Bjork, 1994; Schmidt & Bjork, 1992; Schmidt, 1991a; and Schmidt, 1991b) to the teaching and learning of cane travel.
The study is important, says psychologistUlric Neisser of Emory University in Atlanta, because it shows that the proper spacing of practice during rote learning of vocabulary can produce lasting memories.
Gagne's second condition of learning, intellectual skills requires prior learning of prerequisite skills.
The transformational ability of the computer -- its ability not just to present information but to transform it from one symbol system (like numbers) into another (like a bar graph) -- supports the learning of underlying abstract rules and principles that define the structure of knowledge.
Students become responsible not only for their own learning, but for the learning of others (Mercer & Mercer, 1998).
Coaching has been used as an example of a way of offering enabling intervention into the learning of students.
Stakeholders with a progressivist orientation believe that education is about the discovery of 'facts' through 'logical' inquiry, and the learning of facts and skills that are most relevant to them in their relationship to the world as they are taught to perceive it.
Whereas questions two and three are concerned with the learning of the course content, question four asks: How can the lecturer tell whether or not the learners can do what they have learned in the course?
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