learn about (someone or something)

(redirected from learning about)

learn about (someone or something)

1. To become knowledgeable or informed about someone or something. We learned about the rotation of the planets in science class today. The point of the game is for kids to learn about important historical figures in a fun, exciting way.
2. To discover or uncover some particular information about someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "learn" and "about. I learned something interesting about the way gravity works today. See if you can learn any dirty secrets about our opponent.
See also: learn
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

learn about someone or something

to find out about someone or something. What have you learned about Mr. Franklin and his business dealings? I learned about what causes rain.
See also: learn
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
a) Relate learning about health (care for self and others) to the overall improvements in students' ability to think critically and apply knowledge and skills to the realities of day-to-day living.
By learning about their disabilities, including associated strengths and deficits as well as interventions or accommodations that work, students with learning disabilities can be better prepared to set realistic future goals.
Instead of just learning about past events, we can also learn about what's happening in today's world, and we may even have a chance to affect the future in a positive way."
Reiki practitioners-any level, those interested in learning about Reiki or who wish to receive Reiki healing energy are invited.
For example, discrimination, poverty, and access to fewer resources might prevent urban ethnic minority youths from learning about a broad range of education and vocational opportunities (Kozol, 1991).
* Employees new to security assistance can begin learning about the field in their first week on the job, as opposed to waiting for the next available resident course at DISAM;
Or, he/ she might ask questions of the learner so that the latter may clarify reasons for learning about "magnetism" and "electricity." Here the pupils may use bar magnets to establish ideas pertaining to the north and south pole of a magnet.
They demonstrated a commitment to learning about people different from themselves.
Reiki practitionersany level, those interested in learning about Reiki, those who want to receive Reiki natural healing energy-invited.
In particular, classroom teachers can appreciate learning about the specific HMPQ components in which the teacher can have major influence on homework assignments (e.g., recognition of teacher-motivated students; structure of homework; projects that accommodate various perceptual strengths).
The youth benefited from having hands-on science activities that supplemented their regular science curriculum in a fun nonschool setting, and the college students benefited by gaining practical experience working with diverse youth, viewing the youth in community settings rather than in the traditional classroom, and learning about community resources available to youth.
Learning about organizing, getting administrative and financial support, how to approach community resources, how to identify real needs generated by families and colleagues, and speaking to groups of peers and community were noted by many of the novice teachers.
Courses ranged in topics but basically involved learning about culture, so content was available from the students themselves and new content could be retrieved easily from the web.
Traditional field experiences often can be considered internships (characterized as apprenticeships), where time is spent with others more experienced learning about a particular career, or becoming job-ready (Furco, 2002).
To address this need, the California Virtual Campus Region 3 (http://www.cvc3.org/) funded the Learning About Learning Objects Project to train faculty in the development and use of learning objects.
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